K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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A “defining moment” in editorial writing
Students will be introduced to the definition mode of writing. Students will learn to define a particular subject by responding in an editorial format. Students will first compose an editorial graphic organizer, which will aid in composing a completed editorial using the writing process. This lesson includes modifications for a Novice Low Limited English student.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Susan Brooks and Carrie Mabry.
1869: A report on schools in North Carolina
In this lesson, students look at a report on the status of education in North Carolina in 1869 and discuss the reasons given then for why the Governor and Legislature should support educating North Carolina's children. They are provided an opportunity to compare and contrast the 1869 document against their own ideas about the civic duty to attend school through age sixteen and its relative value to the state and the country.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Victoria Schaefer.
Los dos reyes y los dos laberintos
This lesson focuses on the short story "Los dos reyes y los dos laberintos" written by Jorge Luis Borges. Students interpret the work through reading and group activities. The students will show their interpretation of the theme of the story through a written essay.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Sandra Sigmon.
Oedipus the King: Personal letter-writing assignment
Students will work in groups to evaluate the personality of various characters from Oedipus the King. Each student will write two personal letters in the role of one character from the play responding to the events of the play and the various relationships within it.
Format: lesson plan (grade 10 English Language Arts)
By Greg Townsend.
The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
Students study the symbolism, setting, and characterization in Kafka's work.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts)
By Laura Rose.
To Kill A Mockingbird role-play: A Maycomb pig pickin'
Somewhere near the middle of reading the novel, students start to become confused about characters. This fun role-play activity works especially well just after Chapter 21 and allows students to get to know characters beyond Jem and Scout. It also can be a springboard into further discussions of point of view, theme, and stereotypes.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts)
By David Ansbacher.
Who Moved My Cheese? for Teens
Students read, discuss, and write about Who Moved My Cheese? for Teens by Spencer Johnson, M.D., a parable about life's changes, and how best to benefit from them. By reading the parable, students will learn ways to react positively to inevitable change, and gain insight into their personal decision-making processes regarding changes in their lives, now and in the future. This lesson plan is modified for Advanced English Language Learners in the 9th and 10th grades. It is written for 45 minute class periods, but can be modified for 90 minute block classes.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Ann Gerber.
Ya sé lo que hiciste el verano pasado! Using the preterite indicative tense
This lesson focuses on the uses of the preterite indicative tense and vocabulary related to travel. The students will read various selections that demonstrate the use of the preterite tense and draw pictures to illustrate their understanding. Students will demonstrate their understanding by creating a time line of their life history and sharing it with the class. The lesson culminates with students writing a composition entitled “I know what you did last summer” and presenting it to the class in the target language.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Carolina Thomson and Ronda Hatcher.
Los adjetivos con el verbo “estar”
Students will learn adjectives of emotion with the verb estar and make a booklet illustrating the new vocabulary.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Karen Hayworth.
“ottos mops” by Ernst Jandl
This lesson is designed for students to enjoy a short amusing poem, as well as refine their knowledge of short “o” and long “o” sounds, and use higher order thinking skills to analyze who or what otto and mops are.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Helga Fasciano.
Oedipus the King reader's theatre
Students will rewrite the Greek tragedy in a modern context in order to review and analyze the plot. This assignment is designed as a final project in a Greek Theatre unit. It is expected that the literature has already been read and analyzed as a class. I have found that this project is an innovative way to review for a unit test on the play and Greek Theatre.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts)
Adding support and detail without getting arrested!
This lesson plan is designed to teach students the concept of using facts to support ideas and to interpret (elaborate on) those facts in order to create a synthesized paragraph.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Information Skills)
By Bonnie Mcmurray and Julie Joslin.
Adjectives: Hero versus Villain
Students will compare and contrast a hero and a villain through a variety of oral and written activities.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Rebecca Watkins.
African American college students: Classroom activity
In this lesson plan, students will read a primary source document about African American college students in 1906 and answer a series of questions as they assume the role of a young African American woman in the early 20th century.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
Africans before captivity: Graphic organizer
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an article about the regions of Africa from which most American slaves originated. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer a series of questions.
Format: worksheet/lesson plan (grade 9–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
AIDS in Africa Symposium
Students will take on roles of those with a unique perspective on the AIDS crisis in Africa. Taking part in a symposium, each character, famous and ordinary, makes a statement and participates in a question-answer period.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Greg Mitchell.
Alternative energy: Where's the chemistry?
In Why does chemistry matter in my life?, page 8
In this lesson plan, students research an alternative energy source and develop a five-minute presentation to teach the class about that energy source.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Lisa Hibler.
The American Dream
In conjunction with a unit on Puritanism, students will define and illustrate their personal definition of the American Dream or their concept of the dream in general.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Becky Ackert and Deborah Belknap.
Analyzing author style using sentence combining
This activity should be completed before reading the essay “Beach People, Mountain People” by Suzanne Britt. Students will combine three sets of kernel sentences based on the first paragraph of Britt's writing. They will then compare their sentences to Britt's. The class will discuss what sentence combining strategy or strategies they used and observe how Britt varies her sentences.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts)
By Vickie Smith.
Analyzing significant events in Jim the Boy
This activity, to be completed after reading Tony Earley's Jim the Boy, helps students identify examples and details and then analyze them effectively. The class will brainstorm examples of life-changing events in Jim's life. The teacher will select one of the events, find the pages in the novel where it is discussed, and show the students how to annotate the text by marking details and commenting on them. Using a "T" chart, the class will then select three of the details to analyze.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts)
By Vickie Smith.