K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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1869: A report on schools in North Carolina
In this lesson, students look at a report on the status of education in North Carolina in 1869 and discuss the reasons given then for why the Governor and Legislature should support educating North Carolina's children. They are provided an opportunity to compare and contrast the 1869 document against their own ideas about the civic duty to attend school through age sixteen and its relative value to the state and the country.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Victoria Schaefer.
20th-century warfare: Unique contributions of American Indians
In this lesson, high school students will assess the importance and contributions of the American Indian in the United States' twentieth century wars. They focus in particular on the Navajo Code Talkers.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Social Studies)
By John B. Jones.
4-H on the home front
In this lesson plan, secondary students will analyze a variety of primary source textual materials to investigate how young rural people were encouraged to support the war effort during World War II.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 and 11–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Los dos reyes y los dos laberintos
This lesson focuses on the short story "Los dos reyes y los dos laberintos" written by Jorge Luis Borges. Students interpret the work through reading and group activities. The students will show their interpretation of the theme of the story through a written essay.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Sandra Sigmon.
Ya sé lo que hiciste el verano pasado! Using the preterite indicative tense
This lesson focuses on the uses of the preterite indicative tense and vocabulary related to travel. The students will read various selections that demonstrate the use of the preterite tense and draw pictures to illustrate their understanding. Students will demonstrate their understanding by creating a time line of their life history and sharing it with the class. The lesson culminates with students writing a composition entitled “I know what you did last summer” and presenting it to the class in the target language.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Carolina Thomson and Ronda Hatcher.
Los adjetivos con el verbo “estar”
Students will learn adjectives of emotion with the verb estar and make a booklet illustrating the new vocabulary.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Karen Hayworth.
“ottos mops” by Ernst Jandl
This lesson is designed for students to enjoy a short amusing poem, as well as refine their knowledge of short “o” and long “o” sounds, and use higher order thinking skills to analyze who or what otto and mops are.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Helga Fasciano.
Adding support and detail without getting arrested!
This lesson plan is designed to teach students the concept of using facts to support ideas and to interpret (elaborate on) those facts in order to create a synthesized paragraph.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Information Skills)
By Bonnie Mcmurray and Julie Joslin.
Adjectives: Hero versus Villain
Students will compare and contrast a hero and a villain through a variety of oral and written activities.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Rebecca Watkins.
African American college students: Classroom activity
In this lesson plan, students will read a primary source document about African American college students in 1906 and answer a series of questions as they assume the role of a young African American woman in the early 20th century.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
The African American experience in NC after Reconstruction
The documents included in this lesson come from The North Carolina Experience collection of Documenting the American South and specifically focus on African Americans and race relations in the early 20th century. The lesson juxtaposes accounts that relate to both the positive improvements of black society and arguments against advancement. Combined, these primary sources and the accompanying lesson plan could be used as a Document Based Question (DBQ) in an AP US history course.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Africans before captivity: Graphic organizer
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an article about the regions of Africa from which most American slaves originated. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer a series of questions.
Format: worksheet/lesson plan (grade 9–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Alternative energy: Where's the chemistry?
In Why does chemistry matter in my life?, page 8
In this lesson plan, students research an alternative energy source and develop a five-minute presentation to teach the class about that energy source.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Lisa Hibler.
Analyzing children's letters to Mrs. Roosevelt
Students will analyze letters that children wrote to Eleanor Roosevelt during the Great Depression.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Social Studies)
By Angie Panel Holthausen.
And justice for all: The Trail of Tears, Mexican deportation, and Japanese internment
Many textbooks mention the Trail of Tears, but fail to mention that this early displacement of an ethnic minority is only the one of many legally-sanctioned forced relocations. This lesson will address the displacement of American Indians through the Trail of Tears, the forced deportation of Mexican Americans during the Great Depression, and the internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Patricia Camp.
Apprehending plant killers
In CSI Dublin: The Hunt for the Irish Potato Killer, page 5
In this lesson, students research a plant pathogen of their choice and create a wanted poster.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Rebecca Hite.
Area of solids
Finding area of rectangular solids and cylinders by cutting them into flat pieces and adding the areas.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7–12 Mathematics)
By Dorothy Carawan.
Around the world in one semester!
This lesson is a semester-long project that focuses on countries that speak the target language. Students will research a chosen country and do an oral presentation for the class. They will then research and present a current event weekly for the remainder of the semester.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Crystal Humphrey and Michelle Chrismon.
Art reflects culture or culture reflects art?
This lesson provides social studies teachers with an opportunity to collaborate with visual arts teachers to create an interdisciplinary learning environment for students to study two works of art. It allows students to learn about two different time periods and cultures through art.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Visual Arts Education and Social Studies)
By Amanda Keller.
Atomic spectra and the Bohr model
Students view continuous spectra from incandescent and fluorescent lights and line spectra of selected elements. Students relate energy to frequency of light seen in the spectra. The presence of only certain lines in atomic spectra is related to Bohr's model of the atom. In a second experiment, students determine electron energies in the hydrogen atom.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Lisa Bacon.