K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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“J'adore la pizza” by Karen Kransky: Finding rhyming words in a French poem
This lesson is designed to increase students' awareness of some French letter-sound combinations that rhyme, in spite of being spelled differently using the poem, "J'adore la pizza" by Karen Kransky.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 Second Languages)
By Laura Hemphill.
Mr. Griggs' Work
The students will learn about the importance of responsibility, dependability, punctuality, honesty, and effort in the workplace through the reading of the book Mr. Griggs' Work. The students will have the opportunity to explore these character traits in their own work setting.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance)
By William Hodge.
Night of the Twisters
Reading strategies are used to introduce a literary work.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 English Language Arts)
By Authurice Mitchell.
The Great Gilly Hopkins: Characterization and prediction
In the final chapters of the novel, Gilly's grandmother learns she has a granddaughter and decides to take Gilly out of foster care. Many of my classroom readers are often dismayed by this unexpected conflict and its outcome. In this lesson, the classroom becomes a courtroom where students predict the outcome of this conflict.

This activity can be used at the end of the novel, but I like to use it after reading chapters 10 and 11 so students can compare the courtroom decision to the end of the novel.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–6 English Language Arts)
By Emily Vann.
The Wish Giver: Cause and effect
Through a discussion of the characters in the novel The Wish Giver, by Bill Brittain, the teacher will teach the students to identify and analyze the cause/effect relationship and its importance in reading comprehension.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 English Language Arts)
By Becky Ellzey.
Action chains
Students learn to elaborate on an event in a narrative by expanding their sentences into action chains. Expanding single actions into an action chain provides the reader with a more detailed picture of an event in a narrative.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts)
By DPI Writing Strategies.
Ad savvy
In Food for thought: Elementary lessons on nutrition and healthy living, page 6.4
Commercials are made to sell all kinds of products including foods. This lesson plan for the fifth-grade, from the Food for Thought nutrition curriculum, explores advertising and teaches students how to become critical viewers of food commercials.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 English Language Arts and Healthful Living)
Adding emotions to your story
One way to make stories even better is to show emotions and not just tell them. In this lesson, students will use actions, gestures, and facial expressions to act out emotions.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts)
By DPI Writing Strategies.
Adding fractions with unlike denominators/The numbers tell LCD
Students will be able to find the Lowest Common Denominator by using prime factors. They will then add the fractions. This method was developed for students who have problems guessing and checking.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 Mathematics)
By Wendi Keith.
Albert Einstein
In The Walking Classroom, page 7
In this lesson for fifth grade language arts and science, students listen to a podcast about Albert Einstein and discuss his life and contributions to science.
Format: lesson plan
Algebra for the real world
Students will solve real world and mathematical problem situations using simple algebraic concepts including variables and open sentences.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 Mathematics)
Along the Trail of Tears
A part of history is often forgotten when teaching younger students. This is the relocation of the Cherokee Indians when the white settlers wanted their property. The US Government moved whole groups of Indians under harsh conditions. This trip became known as the Trail of Tears. Using this as a background students will explore and experiment with persuasive writing as they try to express the position of Cherokee leaders.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Glenda Bullard.
Alphabet hunt
Students will find images in our environment which contain letters of the alphabet (either man made or natural) and photograph them so that they appear as the focal point.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 Visual Arts Education)
By Lee Anne Kitzmiller.
Am I a square?
Students should discover how their height is related to their arm span. They will learn how to do spatial and visual estimation, use measuring tools, recognize factional parts of an inch, gather data, and organize and create a graph based on their findings.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 Mathematics)
By Priscilla Hege.
Angry words: What goes around comes around
This is a simple, concrete lesson to illustrate the power of anger to travel from one person to another and to linger in the environment even after the immediate emotion is gone. Strategies for coping with angry feelings are shared.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance)
By Judy Lavore.
Animal friends
This lesson helps students explore personal beliefs and feelings toward others. Students will examine stereotypes and how they influence interactions. The lesson emphasizes peer relationships, awareness of feelings, understanding/accepting differences and self-knowledge.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance)
By Beth Lindsey.
Appositive action
Appositives are descriptive phrases, set off by commas, that modify a noun or noun phrase. Using appositives helps writers create sentences that are smoother and less choppy. In this lesson, students will learn to combine 2 or more descriptive sentences and action sentences into one sentence with an appositive phrase.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts)
By DPI Writing Strategies.
Archaeobotany
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.6
Students will use pictures of seeds, an activity sheet, and a graph to identify seven seeds and the conditions in which they grow. They will also infer ancient plant use by interpreting archaeobotanical samples and determine changing plant use by Native North Carolinians by interpreting a graph of seed frequency over time.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 and 8 Science and Social Studies)
Archaeology as a career
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.2
In their study of archaeology as a career, students will read essays and complete an activity to gain an understanding of and appreciation for the career of a professional archaeologist.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance)
Are you listening?
Students will learn the importance of listening and how to listen effectively.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance)
By Linda Bazemore.