K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

About this recording

Naomi Trammel interviewed by Allen Tullos, Greenville, South Carolina, March 25, 1980. Interview # H-258 in the Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007), Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Provider
Southern Oral History Program
Date created
1980
Duration
1:48
File
MP3
License
This recording copyright ©2004. All Rights Reserved
Source
Original audio housed by UNC Libraries / Documenting the American South

See this recording in context

  • North Carolina in the New South: Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot. (Page 3.5)
  • North Carolina History: A Sampler: A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it. (Page 5.2)

In the classroom

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Naomi Trammel talks about entertainment in the mill village.

Transcript

ALLEN TULLOS:
When you-all were back at the Victor Mill in Greer, what kind of things would you do for entertainment or recreation? They had baseball—

NAOMI SIZEMORE TRAMMEL:
They had just had ball games, you know, and box suppers, and things like that. It’s about all they had.

ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember any musicians in the community? Any people that played guitars or fiddles, or had dances in people’s houses?

NAOMI SIZEMORE TRAMMEL:
Oh, yeah. Yeah. I used to go to dances at Henry Greer’s, he was a real dancer. Henry Greer. We’d get up a gang, you know. Garvin Sellers, he was the manager of the ball team, and he’d get up crowd of girls, and we’d go to that dance. Well, if Mr. Gwin said I could go, I’d go. And if he felt that I shouldn’t go, he’d find out who was going. Well, he’d tell ‘em, and that’d be the last of it. And if he said I’d go, I’d go.

ALLEN TULLOS:
What would happen at a dance?

NAOMI SIZEMORE TRAMMEL:
Well, they’d just dance, you know.

ALLEN TULLOS:
At somebody’s house.

NAOMI SIZEMORE TRAMMEL:
At somebody’s house. That the only place they had, you know, then. They didn’t never go to the halls for dances.

ALLEN TULLOS:
And people would move the furniture out of the room?

NAOMI SIZEMORE TRAMMEL:
Yeah. [laughter] In living room. Just clear it up, you know, and have a dance. We wouldn’t only go to Henry Greer’s, we’d go to other places too. If it was all right. But we’d all go in gangs.

ALLEN TULLOS:
Would there be a fiddle player, a guitar player, banjo?

NAOMI SIZEMORE TRAMMEL:
Yeah. Yeah, fiddle player. Yeah, just ordinary music, you know, like country people have.