K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

About this photograph

Provided by the Sappony Indian Tribe.

Date created
August 19, 2011
License
This photograph copyright ©2011. All Rights Reserved

See this photograph in context

  • Teaching about North Carolina American Indians: This web edition is drawn from a teachers institute curriculum enrichment project on North Carolina American Indian Studies conducted by the North Carolina Humanities Council. Resources include best practices for teaching about American Indians, suggestions for curriculum integration, webliographies, and lesson plans about North Carolina American Indians. (Page 8.2)

In the classroom

  • See our collection of articles on visual literacy for ideas on using photographs meaningfully in the classroom.

Sizes available: 400×499 | 160×200

This marker tells the story of the High Plains Indian School, which opened in 1888. The school is no longer in operation. The marker reads:

Established in 1888 for the Indians of Person County. First one room school was built on Green Martin’s land 1 mile east. The second and third schools were built on land donated by Ditrion W. and Mary M. Epps in 1903. The school was unique in that it was financed by North Carolina and Virginia. In 1962, the school was closed and the student body transferred to Bethel Hill and Allensville Schools.

Image for non-commercial, educational purposes only.