K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

About this photograph

Margery H. Freeman
Date created
Otavalo, Ecuador
This photograph copyright ©2006. Terms of use

See this photograph in context

  • Traditional weaving in Ecuador: Photographs and text illustrate traditional weaving in Ecuador, from carding and spinning wool to selling finished products at the market. (Page 2)

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In the classroom

  • See our collection of articles on visual literacy for ideas on using photographs meaningfully in the classroom.
Carding wool in Otavalo, Ecuador

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A kneeling woman adjusts her wooden carding paddle. She is wearing a dark shawl over an embroidered white blouse.

Carding wool is the last stage in preparing raw wool for weaving. A craftsperson uses a wooden paddle with steel tines to separate the wool, straightening and cleaning it before it can be added to the loom.

Otavalo is in the highlands of Ecuador, between the rainforest and the coast. Many of the inhabitants of the area continue to practice traditional ways of life, including retaining their Quechua language, wearing traditional garments, and practicing age-old occupations. Otavalo in particular is known for its highly-skilled weavers. In a tradition that pre-dates the arrival of the Incas, Otavalo weavers are famous for their wool ponchos, blankets, and wall coverings. These products and more can be found in Otavalo’s large market.