K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

About this photograph

Creator
Margery H. Freeman
Date created
January 1980
Location
Guadalajara, Mexico
License
This photograph copyright ©2007. Terms of use

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Orozco Mural in Guadalajara, Mexico

Size: 1024×709

A multi-colored mural adorns a stone wall. The mural depicts a stylized violent scene dominated by Nazi symbolism.

The mural’s artist is José Clemente Orozco (1883–1949). Orozco was a member of the highly-influential group of artists that emerged in Mexico after the violent upheaval of the Revolution (1910-1921). Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and Orozco redirected Mexican artistic imagery to include scenes from Mexico’s past. Rivera and Orozco in particular often used the medium of al fresco painting on walls. This mural was painted on an interior wall of the Governor’s palace in Guadalajara.

Guadalajara was founded soon after the conquest of Mexico in the sixteenth century and has grown to be one of Mexico’s primary cities. It is the second largest city in Mexico, behind Mexico City, and is the industrial capital of the country. The city is famous for its manufacture of hardware and software for Mexico’s technology industry. It is also a popular tourist destination for its blend of colonial sites and modern conveniences.