K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

About this map

Created by LEARN NC using base map from Nationalatlas.gov.

Date created
2007
Location
North Carolina
License
This map copyright ©2007. Terms of use

See this map in context

  • Colonial North Carolina: Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars. (Page 1.4)
  • Colonial North Carolina: Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars. (Page 1.3)

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In the classroom

  • See our collection of articles on visual literacy for ideas on using photographs meaningfully in the classroom.
map showing the territory in North America granted to the Lords Proprietors under the Carolina Charter of 1663 and Charter of 1665

Size: 704×435

This map shows the original borders of the province of Carolina as defined by the 1663 Charter of Carolina (dark green) and the subsequent charter of 1665 (light green).

Under the charter of 1663, the borders of Carolina are defined as all the land from 31° to 36° north latitude, from the Atlantic to the Pacific. In 1663, no one knew for certain just how far away the Pacific was, and no one in England had any immediate plans to find out, so this was a purely theoretical grant of land. In practice, the Lords Proprietors were granted land as far west as they could find men to colonize it.

Carolina’s boundaries were also determined by geographic features believed to be at the specified latitudes. The northern boundary is defined as the latitude of Lucke Island, in the “south Virginia seas” — Albemarle Sound. Virginians had already settled Albemarle, and that settlement was left under the control of Virginia’s governor.

The southern boundary is also defined as the latitude of the mouth of the St. Matthias River, now called the St. Johns River, on the coast of Florida. The 31° latitude line is actually a bit north of the current Georgia-Florida border, while the St. Johns River emerges near present-day Jacksonville, Florida. At the time, Spain controlled Florida, and Carolina was intended as a buffer against Spanish expansion in America. Georgia would be carved out of Carolina in 1733. (On this map, the line is drawn to match the location of the mouth of the St. Johns River, not the 31° latitude line.)

Two years later, the Carolina Charter of 1665 enlarged this grant, definining Carolina’s northern boundary at “the north end of Currituck River or Inlet, upon a strait westerly line to Wyanoak Creek,” or 36° 30′ (36 degrees 30 minutes, or 36 and one-half degrees) north latitude. The southern boundary was then defined as 29° north latitude, which would place it in northern Florida. That northern line added the Albemarle settlement to Carolina and became the present-day border between North Carolina and Virginia, although it took several border disputes and attempts at surveying before everyone finally agreed on where, exactly, it was.