K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

About this painting

Painter unknown.

Date created
This work is believed to be in the public domain. Users are advised to make their own copyright assessment and to understand their rights to fair use.

See this painting in context

  • Colonial North Carolina: Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars. (Page 1.5)

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In the classroom

  • See our collection of articles on visual literacy for ideas on using photographs meaningfully in the classroom.
portraig of Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon

Size: 378×452

Edward Hyde (1609–1674), 1st Earl of Clarendon, began his career in Parliament in 1640 as a critic of King Charles I, but eventually became one of the king’s close advisors and served as chancellor of the exchequer. After Charles I was executed, Hyde wrote a history of the Civil War, and eventually joined the future Charles I in exile.

After the Restoration, he became Lord Chancellor of England and was named Earl of Clarendon. His daughter Anne married the king’s brother James, and two of their daughters later became queen (Mary I and Anne).

In 1663, he was one of eight Lords Proprietors to whom Charles II granted the province of Carolina, which became the colonies of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.