LEARN NC

K–12 teaching and learning · from the UNC School of Education

About this map

Nicholas Comberford. The South Part of Virginia Now the North Part of Carolina. 1657.

Date created
1657
Location
North Carolina
License
This work is believed to be in the public domain. Users are advised to make their own copyright assessment and to understand their rights to fair use.
Source
Original image housed by North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, Division of Archives and History

See this map in context

  • Colonial North Carolina: Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars. (Page 1.3)

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In the classroom

  • See our collection of articles on visual literacy for ideas on using photographs meaningfully in the classroom.
1657 map of North Carolina.

Sizes available: 2179×1656 | 300×228

Nicholas Comberford’s 1657 map, The South Part of Virginia Now the North Part of Carolina. The east coast of North Carolina is drawn along the bottom edge of the map. The map extends south as far as Cape Fear and north as far as what appears to be the Virginia border. The western part of the map (on the top edge) is marked as Tuscarora Indian territory. Between the Pamlico Sound and Albemarle Sound (labeled the Roanoake Sound), the map is labeled “This is a swampy wilderness;” the land north of Albemarle Sound is labeled the same.

The house of Nathaniel Batts, the first known permanent settler on the Albemarle Sound, appears on the map on a piece of land between the Chowan (labeled Choan) River and the “Morallico River.”