LEARN NC

K–12 teaching and learning · from the UNC School of Education

Documenting the American South (DocSouth), a digital publishing initiative sponsored by the University Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, provides access to digitized primary materials that offer Southern perspectives on American history and culture. It supplies teachers, students, and researchers at every educational level with a wide array of titles they can use for reference, studying, teaching, and research.

DocSouth has contributed numerous resources to LEARN NC’s digital textbook project for North Carolina history. Additionally, LEARN NC publishes lesson plans that integrate digitized resources from DocSouth’s collections.

Resources provided by UNC Libraries / Documenting the American South

Oral History Interview with Bert Pickett, December 18, 1999
Charles Thompson Well, yeah. You had four or five vehicles lost. Bert Pickett In the family, because my wife's aunt came down to live with us. There were five cars lost in one family. I lost three of my own....
Format: audio/interview
Oral History Interview with Billy Ray Hall, January 20, 2000
Charles Thompson What are the effects of the flood as you describe them? Billy Ray Hall I think anytime you start talking about numbers they are only understandable when you put them in relation to something....
Format: audio/interview
Oral History Interview with Daniel Okun, October 22, 1985
Laura Drey How did you become involved in the Cane Creek reservoir issue? Daniel Okun Well, in the first place I live here, though I don't use the OWASA water. We live out of town, but when the Cane Creek...
Format: audio/interview
Oral History Interview with Edward S. Johnson, October 28, 1985
There was another meeting the next week; and there seemed to be general community opposition to the reservoir; and also a lot of ignorance about what the law was, and whether there was any recourse at this late date, and so on. So there was a lot of information-gathering...
Format: audio/interview
Oral History Interview with Lawrence Ridgle, June 3, 1999
Alicia Rouverol So what happened to the community when those businesses went out? A number of people have talked about— Lawrence Ridgle They appeased us in a way, I believe, this is just my thought—when...
Format: audio/interview
Oral History Interview with Raymond, Eunice, Wayne, and Charles Russell English, December 8, 1999
Charles Thompson Not at all. We haven't talked so much about your experience about what happened with flood relief. Do you have any vivid memories about... Wayne English I think everyone's got strong opinions...
Format: audio/interview
Oral History Interview with Robert Riley, February 1, 1994
Riley recalls the greatest shock of his life: hearing that the White Furniture factory in Mebane was closing. While Riley remembers the news as a shock, he remembers also that the arrival of new management and a weak economy sent a clear message that the plant...
Format: audio/interview
Oral History Interview with Ted Fillette, March 2, 2006.
Sarah Theusen When you first came here, some of your early work was picking up on work that had been done by your colleagues here, helping victims displaced by urban renewal. Is that right? Ted Fillette Yeah, that...
Format: audio/interview
Orange County inhabitants petition Governor Tryon
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.6
Petition from residents of Orange County, North Carolina, to Governor William Tryon, May 1768, apologizing for recent acts of violence by Regulators and asking him to address the illegal fees demanded by court officials. Includes historical commentary.
Format: petition/primary source
Ostenco's address to William Tryon
Address by Osteneco to William Tryon concerning the boundary between North Carolina and Cherokee land June 2d 1767. Jud's Friend's Talk to Governor Tryon in Answer to his Excellency's Talk delivered yesterday at Tyger River Camp. We have met here...
Format: speech/primary source
Pay raise
In Postwar North Carolina, page 9.5
Fifth part of an oral history interview with Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: interview
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Perspectives on school desegregation: Harriet Love
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.12
Interview with a woman who attended an all-black high school in Charlotte in the 1960s but whose children attended integrated schools, about the unintended effects of school desegregation. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Physical geography
In Report of Vice-Consul R. E. Heide on the Resources, Trade and Commerce of North Carolina (1875), page 2
Physical geography The State is naturally divided into three distinct regions: The Eastern, Middle and Western. The Eastern, which comprises about two-thirds of the State or 20,000 square miles, is made up of a succession of low sand ridges which...
Format: book
Plan for a two-room mill house
Plan for a two-room mill house
Format: image/diagram
Plans for a four-room mill house with gable
Plans for a four-room mill house with gable
Format: image/diagram
Plans for a three-room narrow mill house
Plans for a three-room narrow mill house
Format: image/diagram
Plans for democracy
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.12
Instructions to delegates from Orange County, North Carolina, to the Provinicial Congress in November 1776, about what sort of state constitution they should support. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
A Pledge to Violate the Stamp Act
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 2.5
In 1766, during the colonial protests of the Stamp Act, some residents of eastern North Carolina, including many colonial leaders, signed this pledge to refuse to pay the tax. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Politics
In Postwar North Carolina, page 9.6
Final part of an oral history interview with Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: interview
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
Population
In Report of Vice-Consul R. E. Heide on the Resources, Trade and Commerce of North Carolina (1875), page 7
Population The original settlers came principally from Scotland, the North of Ireland, England and Germany. Many of the colonists came over direct from Europe, and others by way of the Northern States. The most numerous and industrious class is probably...
Format: book