K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

ATTENTION USERS

LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

Learn more

Related pages

  • Dear Peter Rabbit: Students will identify formal language and sentence structures in friendly letters. They will use similar formal language and style to create friendly letters to other story book characters.
  • Monstrous masks: Teacher will read the book Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak. Children will create monster masks to associate the letter m and the phonemic sound of m to the masks.
  • Learning language strategies through repeated readings of storybooks: This lesson will guide and teach students how to process and produce language at higher levels through meaningful, redundant, contextually appropriate, and intrinsically rewarding center-based activities related to a storybook theme.

Related topics

Help

Please read our disclaimer for lesson plans.

Legal

The text of this page is copyright ©2008. See terms of use. Images and other media may be licensed separately; see captions for more information and read the fine print.

Learning outcomes

Students will:

  • learn that there is a special month for recognizing the contributions women have made in American history.
  • compare the actual book to the larger-than life images captured by a digital camera and projected on the Smart TV’s monitor.
  • look at the women in their world and choose one or two who are especially important to them.
  • interview one or two of these women and prepare a picture and short, dictated or self-written paragraph explaining her importance to them
  • present their work orally or the work may be posted on the library media center’s web page.

Teacher planning

Time required for lesson

3 weeks

Materials/resources

Technology resources

  • Digital camera
  • Smart TV
  • Computer interfacing with the TV
  • Microsoft PowerPoint

Pre-activities

Before beginning this lesson, students should have:

  • some pre-reading skills
  • the ability to sit and be a good listener for about 15 minutes
  • training in good audience skills
  • understanding and some competency with participating in a group discussion.
  • familiarity with the parts of a book cover: title, author, illustrator, spine, and spine label
  • an understanding of the function of the spine label as it applies to books from the Media Center

Prior to the lessons the librarian/media specialist should prepare a slide program using slide show software. Using the pictures from the book, take several pictures of the whole page and smaller zoomed in pictures of the details on the page.

Activities

Session 1

  1. Gather the students around the storytelling area and discuss with them what National Women’s History Month is all about. Solicit their comments about any ladies in history they remember. (Martha Washington, Mary Todd Lincoln, Harriett Tubman).
  2. Tell them that they have not been in school long enough to really know much about American history but that they have their own personal history. At this point, ask them to think about very special, important women in their own lives--their own history. The discussion should be lively and the students should be lead to recall their teachers and principal (if she is a woman).
  3. Show the copy of My Great-Aunt Arizona and tell them that you will read to them a very special story about a lady who had a strong influence. Explain that the book IS a beautiful picture book, but that it was written about a real person who had lived in a real time and that the story is true. Continue to explain that books written about real people and their real lives are called “biography.”
  4. Read the story, stopping to explain unfamiliar terms and to encourage close observation of the illustrations. Ad-lib repetition of the phrases:
    “…with her long braids wrapped around and around her head, her long full dress, a pretty apron, high-topped buttoned up shoes and many petticoats (It sure is difficult to explain what a petticoat is to the children today!),”
    and
    “she taught the children about words and numbers and all the faraway places they you go one day.”
    The students will catch on and soon become co-readers.
  5. Demonstrate what it would have been like to read your lessons all at one time in a one-room school by singing three different children’s songs at the same time. For example, “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” and “Row, Row, Row Your Boat.”
  6. After the story, use the strategy of “shared talking” and allow the students time to interact with each other about the parts of the story and illustrations they liked.
  7. Take the class from the storytelling area to where the presentation station is set-up. Show them some slides from the book. Especially effective are close-ups of the deer on the dedication page, the baby in the schoolroom, the lunch pails, and the globe. Explain briefly how the visual effect was achieved (camera, disk, cable connecting the TV and computer, etc).

Session 2

  1. Remind the students of the previous lesson. Review the meaning of biography. Re-read the story using the slide show presentation. Stop to explain unfamiliar terms and to encourage close observation of the illustrations.
  2. After the story, use the strategy of “shared talking” and allow the students time to interact with each other about the parts of the story and illustrations they liked. Ask them to compare the previous lesson to the one presented today. What was different and the same about each one? A Venn diagram could be made if there is the time and space.
  3. Continue using the presentation to explain the interview assignment. See the attached parent letter, drawing sheet, interview questions, and writing/drawing prompt.

Session 3

  1. The students should bring back their pictures and short paragraphs.
  2. Remind them that they started by talking about women who have help change the lives of others.
  3. Allow each student to present his/her “favorite lady” and the picture. Use the digital camera to take quick snapshots, download them into a slideshow program, and set it to loop as the students go about their book check out.

Assessment

See attached rubric

Supplemental information

Comments

I was inspired to become a teacher by my grandmother, Flora Atchley Large, who taught in a two-room Appalachian school for 35 years and the founder of the college that my parents and I attended in the Appalachian mountains of Georgia, Martha Berry. When I first read this story, it reminded me so much of the influence these women had on the hundreds and thousands of lives of which many became teachers. What a great vehicle to use to introduce young children in a North Carolina school to National Women’s History Month and the genre of biography!

I love the tech connection, not so much for the tech, but that the children could actually appreciate the beauty of the illustrations.

  • Common Core State Standards
    • English Language Arts (2010)
      • Reading: Informational Text

        • Grade 1
          • 1.RIT.10 With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for grade 1.
        • Kindergarten
          • K.RIT.10 Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.
      • Writing

        • Grade 1
          • 1.W.8 With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
        • Kindergarten
          • K.W.8 With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

  • North Carolina Essential Standards
    • Social Studies (2010)
      • Grade 1

        • 1.H.1 Understand that history tells a story of how people and events changed society over time. 1.H.1.1 Explain how and why neighborhoods and communities change over time. 1.H.1.2 Explain the importance of folklore and celebrations and their impact on local...
      • Kindergarten

        • K.H.1 Understand change over time. K.H.1.1 Explain how people change over time (self and others). K.H.1.2 Explain how seasons change over time. K.H.1.3 Explain the impact of how life events bring change (a new sibling, moving to a new house, a new job, a new...

North Carolina curriculum alignment

English Language Arts (2004)

Grade 1

  • Goal 2: The learner will develop and apply strategies and skills to comprehend text that is read, heard, and viewed.
    • Objective 2.02: Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of texts (storybooks, short chapter books, newspapers, telephone books, and everyday print such as signs and labels, poems, word plays using alliteration and rhyme, skits and short plays).
    • Objective 2.03: Read and comprehend both fiction and nonfiction text appropriate for grade one using:
      • prior knowledge.
      • summary.
      • questions.
      • graphic organizers.
  • Goal 4: The learner will apply strategies and skills to create oral, written, and visual texts.
    • Objective 4.02: Use words that name characters and settings (who, where) and words that tell action and events (what happened, what did ___ do) in simple texts.

Kindergarten

  • Goal 1: The learner will develop and apply enabling strategies to read and write.
    • Objective 1.01: Develop book and print awareness:
      • identify the parts of books and function of each part.
      • demonstrate an understanding of directionality and voice-print match by following print word for word when listening to familiar text read aloud.
      • demonstrate an understanding of letters, words, and story.
      • identify the title, name of the author and the name of the illustrator.
  • Goal 2: The learner will develop and apply strategies and skills to comprehend text that is read, heard, and viewed.
    • Objective 2.01: Demonstrate sense of story (e.g., beginning, middle, end, characters, details).
    • Objective 2.02: Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of types of books and selections (e.g., picture books, caption books, short informational texts, nursery rhymes, word plays/finger plays, puppet plays, reenactments of familiar stories).
    • Objective 2.03: Use preparation strategies to activate prior knowledge and experience before and during the reading of a text.
    • Objective 2.05: Predict possible events in texts before and during reading.

Information Skills (2000)

Grade 1

  • Goal 1: The learner will EXPLORE sources and formats for reading, listening, and viewing purposes.
    • Objective 1.01: Participate in read-aloud, storytelling, booktalking, silent and voluntary reading experiences.
    • Objective 1.06: Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of types of books and resources (print, non-print, electronic).
    • Objective 1.09: Demonstrate awareness that resources convey meaning and exist in a variety of formats (print, graphical, audio, video, multimedia, web-based).

Kindergarten

  • Goal 1: The learner will EXPLORE sources and formats for reading, listening, and viewing purposes.
    • Objective 1.01: Participate in read-aloud, storytelling, booktalking, silent and voluntary reading experiences.
    • Objective 1.06: Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of types of books and resources (print, non-print, electronic).
    • Objective 1.09: Demonstrate awareness that resources convey meaning and exist in a variety of formats (print, graphical, audio, video, multimedia).