K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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  • Magic E: Decoding/encoding with CVC & CVCE: Students will participate in two activities involving the consonant-vowel-consonant-silent e (CVCE) pattern: a decoding activity involving attaching a clothes pin with the letter e printed on it to consonant-vowel-consonant words (CVC) and sounding the new CVCE words; and an encoding activity involving dictation of CVC and CVCE words from the first activity which students are to write using auditory and tactile strategies. These activities require that students have prior knowledge of consonant and long and short vowel sounds as well as blending of these sounds in CVC pattern words.
  • The long and short of it!: This lesson will assist students in recognizing and discriminating short and long vowel sounds.
  • Phonics fun: Kid Pix Deluxe software is needed for this lesson. Using this program, students will decode and blend one-syllable short-vowel words and words ending with silent "e" to match pictures with words as well as to spell names of pictures.

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Learning outcomes

The student will learn how to divide words into syllables to sound out the word.

Teacher planning

Time required for lesson

60-90 Minutes

Materials/resources

The student needs reading materials that are on the independent and instructional level of the student. These could include their reading book, their content area book, the newspaper, favorite magazine, etc.

Pre-activities

The student must be able to identify a-e-i-o-u- and sometimes y as vowels and bcdfghjklmnpqrstvwxz as consonants. The student must also be able to use phonics. It is quite helpful to remind the student of short vowel sound to have a poster on the wall that has the words:

  • cat for a,
  • egg for e,
  • sip for i,
  • of for o,
  • and us for u

The student should understand context clues and also have knowledge of using picture clues when available.

Activities

  1. Teacher: “I have a secret for you today! There are patterns in words that can help you read. There are vowel and consonant patterns in words that will help you figure out what a word is when you do not know it. Let’s start with the first pattern. I am going to write down VCV which means Vowel, Consonant, Vowel. I want you to write down the word “Susan” and start with the first vowel you see and put “v” below the first vowel and a “c” below the consonant and continue naming each letter whether it is a vowel or consonant.”
    • Teacher checks to see if the student has written a “v” below the vowels and a “c” below the consonants.
  2. Teacher: “Next, I am going to tell you where to break up the word. I want you to find the “VCV” pattern in the word “Susan”. I want you to put a break up line after the first “V”. Like this…V-CV. Now I want you to put a break up line in the word Susan. Like this: Su-san. Now I want you to try to pronounce the little words you have just broken the word “Susan” into.”
  3. The teacher encourages the student to sound out Su-san. If the student is having a bit of trouble sounding out the second syllable, write down the word, “and” and ask the student to say it. Then, erase the “d” and ask the student to say “an.” Then write down a “s” in front of the “an” and ask the student to say “san.” Then point to the first syllable, “Su” and ask the student to pronounce it. When the student says the first syllable, point to the second syllable, “san” and ask them to say it. Then ask the student to put the two little words together and say the word. Continue with the list of given words below for guided practice with the V-CV and VC-CV patterns with the student: Friday, student, copy, position, shiver, ready, family, mineral, recipe, relevant.
  4. Teacher: “Now, I am going to give you a second pattern to look for. I am going to write down VCCV which means Vowel, Consonant, Consonant, Vowel. I want you to write down the word “important” and start with the first vowel you see and put a “v” below the first vowel and a “c” below the consonant and continue naming each letter whether it is a vowel or consonant.”
  5. Teacher will check to see if the student has written a “v” below the vowels and a “c” below the consonants.
  6. Teacher: “Next, I am going to tell you where to break up the word. I want you to find the “VCCV” pattern in the word “important”. I want you to put a break up line after the first “C”. Like this…VC-CV. Now I want you to put a break up line in the word “important”. Like this im-portant. Now, do you see a second VC-CV pattern? Put a break up line in the second VC-CV pattern. Now, I want you to put a break up line in the word too. It should look like this: im-por-tant. Now I want you to try to pronounce the little words you have just broken the word “important” into.
  7. The teacher encourages the student to sound out im-por-tant. Continue with the list of given words for guided practice with the student: Carla, morning, Wednesday, poster, sections, correct, camping, borrow, railroad, clipper.

Assessment

Given 10 words following the VCV and VCCV patterns, the student will correctly put the word into syllables on their own sheet of paper. and correctly pronounce the word to the teacher orally.

Supplemental information

When the student has mastered the decoding of the V-CV and VC-CV patterns in words, the student can use this skill when he is reading other materials and comes across a word he does not know.

To build on this skill, the teacher will address other phonetic rules to help pronounce unknown words. For example:

  • two vowels coming together, the first one says its name and the second one is silent, as in “eat”
  • if a silent “e” comes at the end of a word, the vowel, say its name, as in the word “cake”
  • if an “i” or an “e” follows a “c”, then say the “s” sound for the “c”,as in receive
  • if an “e” follows a “g”, then the “g” sounds like a “j”, like in the word “cage”

Comments

As I have used this lesson plan with secondary exceptional students who have a second grade reading level, I find the student can read around the word and their brain will automatically help them “catch” the word. They have heard all the words that they can not readily read. These unknown reading words are in their “listening” vocabulary. I encourage them strongly to break up the “unknown” word, try to sound it out and listen to what their brain “tells” them the word is. It is wonderfully exciting to witness the student realize that “THEY” are reading the words and no one is telling them the word.

As I have told the students:
I want to teach you how to fish so you can eat dinner each day of your life. I do not want to give you one fish so you can only eat dinner tonight!

  • Common Core State Standards
    • English Language Arts (2010)
      • Reading: Foundational Skills

        • Grade 1
          • 1.RFS.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. 1.RFS.3.1 Know the spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs (two letters that represent one sound). 1.RFS.3.2 Decode regularly spelled one-syllable words....
        • Grade 2
          • 2.RFS.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. 2.RFS.3.1 Distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled one-syllable words. 2.RFS.3.2 Know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel...

North Carolina curriculum alignment

English Language Arts (2004)

Grade 2

  • Goal 1: The learner will develop and apply enabling strategies and skills to read and write.
    • Objective 1.01: Use phonics knowledge and structural analysis (e.g., knowledge of syllables, suffixes, prefixes, root words) to decode regular multi-syllable words when reading text.