K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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The demonstration method of teaching shows learners how to do a task using sequential instructions with the end goal of having learners perform the tasks independently.

Demonstrations in the classroom

Demonstrations can be used to provide examples that enhance lectures and to offer effective hands-on, inquiry-based learning opportunities in classes or labs. Used in classes of all sizes in multiple grade and subject areas, demonstrations are most commonly found in science and technology courses.1

When using the demonstration model in the classroom, the teacher, or some other expert on the topic being taught, performs the tasks step-by-step so that the learner will eventually be able to complete the same task independently. The eventual goal is for learners to not only duplicate the task, but to recognize how to problem-solve when unexpected obstacles or problems arise. After performing the demonstration, the teacher’s role becomes supporting students in their attempts, providing guidance and feedback, and offering suggestions for alternative approaches.2