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This activity is designed to be used with the article “A Royal Colony.” The true/false statements will enable students to compare what they previously knew about the early Carolina colony with what they’ve learned by reading the article.

In the PDF version of this lesson plan (see print and share menu), this worksheet appears on a separate page for ease of printing.

Royal colony worksheet

Read the following statements. Before you read the article “A Royal Colony,” write whether you believe the statement is true or false. Then after you read the article, write down whether the statement actually is true or false, and correct the false statements by adding words and/or crossing out incorrect words.

Before reading Statement After reading
  Since the 1660s, the Proprietors had realized that one governor could not control both the northern and southern part of the Carolina Colony.  
  The most important early settlements were Albemarle area, Cape Fear area, and Charles Towne.  
  In 1691, the Proprietors put a deputy governor in charge of the southern part of the Carolina Colony.  
  North and South Carolina were separated before the Tuscarora War.  
  South Carolina was made a royal colony before North Carolina.  
  North Carolina was more valuable to England than South Carolina.  
  A royal colony was ruled by Parliament.  
  Seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold North Carolina to the king.  
  The colonial Assembly had very little power during the colonial period.  
  When North Carolina became a royal colony, settlers greatly relied on the newly appointed royal officials in running the colony.  

After you have read the article “A Royal Colony,” list three things you have learned about the new royal colony.

How do you think the transition from a proprietary colony to a royal colony might affect North Carolina in the fifty years after 1729?

Additional discussion questions

  1. What were the reasons for splitting the Carolina Colony into North and South Carolina?
  2. Why did the king make first South Carolina and then North Carolina into royal colonies?
  3. What was the Granville District and why do you think it became important in the years following 1729?
  4. What are some differences between royal and proprietary colonies?
  5. What were effects of the separation between North and South Carolina?

Anticipation guide (Teacher guide)

Read the following statements. Before you read the article “A Royal Colony,” write whether you believe the statement is true or false. Then after you read the article, write down whether the statement actually is true or false, and correct the false statements by adding words and/or crossing out incorrect words.

Before reading Statement After reading
  Since the 1660s, the Proprietors had realized that one governor could not control both the northern and southern part of the Carolina Colony. true
  The most important early settlements were Albemarle area, Cape Fear area, and Charles Towne. true
  In 1691, the Proprietors put a deputy governor in charge of the southern part of the Carolina Colony. (northern) false
  North and South Carolina were separated before the Tuscarora War. (after the beginning of) false
  South Carolina was made a royal colony before North Carolina. true
  North Carolina was more valuable to England than South Carolina. (South, North) false
  A royal colony was ruled by Parliament. (the king) false
  Seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold North Carolina to the king. true
  The colonial Assembly had very little power during the colonial period. (a great deal of) false
  When North Carolina became a royal colony, settlers greatly relied on the newly appointed royal officials in running the colony. (distrusted and/or resented) false

After you have read the article “A Royal Colony,” list three things you have learned about the new royal colony.

How do you think the transition from a proprietary colony to a royal colony might affect North Carolina in the fifty years after 1729?

Answers will vary, but most students will indicate that within that time the colony joined with the others to fight in the Revolution as the king gained more power and asserted his authority.

  • North Carolina Essential Standards
    • Social Studies (2010)
      • Grade 8

        • 8.H.1 Apply historical thinking to understand the creation and development of North Carolina and the United States. 8.H.1.1 Construct charts, graphs, and historical narratives to explain particular events or issues. 8.H.1.2 Summarize the literal meaning of...
        • 8.H.3 Understand the factors that contribute to change and continuity in North Carolina and the United States. 8.H.3.1 Explain how migration and immigration contributed to the development of North Carolina and the United States from colonization to contemporary...

North Carolina curriculum alignment

Social Studies (2003)

Grade 8

  • Goal 1: The learner will analyze important geographic, political, economic, and social aspects of life in the region prior to the Revolutionary Period.
    • Objective 1.06: Identify geographic and political reasons for the creation of a distinct North Carolina colony and evaluate the effects on the government and economics of the colony.