K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

David Walbert

David Walbert was Editorial and Web Director of LEARN NC until 2011. In that role, he was responsible for all of LEARN NC’s educational publications, overseeing development of various web applications including LEARN NC’s website and content management systems, and was the organization’s primary web, information, and visual designer.

David holds a Ph.D. in History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of Garden Spot: Lancaster County, the Old Order Amish, and the Selling of Rural America, published in 2002 by Oxford University Press. With LEARN NC, he has written numerous articles for K–12 teachers on topics such as historical education, visual literacy, writing instruction, and technology integration.

Resources created by David Walbert

The 1868 constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.11
In accordance with the Reconstruction Acts, North Carolina wrote a new constitution in 1868. In addition to abolishing slavery, the new constitution gave more power to the people and to the governor, and called for free public schools, state prisons, and charitable institutions.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The 1950 Senate campaign
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.6
Campaign poster from the 1950 U.S. Senate election in North Carolina, in which Willis Smith played to white voters' racism in defeating Frank Porter Graham. Includes historical background.
Format: poster/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The 1971 constitution
In Postwar North Carolina, page 8.3
North Carolina's constitution was rewritten in 1971 to incorporate the many amendments made since Reconstruction.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
4-H club contributions to the war effort
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.7
This page includes three reports sent by county agents of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service after the war ended. Each county agent outlined the contributions of 4-H club members in his or her county to the war effort. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
4-H mobilization for victory (1943)
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.4
In this letter to local extension agents, the North Carolina Director of Extension, J. O. Shaub, explained what 4-H clubs needed to do to mobilize youth to aid the war effort during World War II. Includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
About wills and probate inventories
In Colonial North Carolina, page 7.1
Explanation of legal documents surrounding a person's death and how historians use them to understand daily life, family structure, and other aspects of the past.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Address to the Colored People of North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.7
1870 broadside urging African Americans to support Governor William Woods Holden, then facing impeachment for his use of the militia to stop Ku Klux Klan violence. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poster/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Advertising new products
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.6
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 4.5
Advertisements from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries show new technologies, new tastes, and new ways of marketing goods to consumers.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Allen House
Allen House
The Allen House, a log home occupied by John Allen and his family in the late 1700s. Allen built the house for his family around 1780 near Snow Camp, North Carolina, in Alamance County. In 1967 the house was donated to the state and was moved to Alamance Battleground....
Format: image/photograph
Allen House cellar door
Allen House cellar door
Photo of the cellar door at the Allen House in Alamance County, North Carolina.
Format: image/photograph
Alternatives to the famous person report
In Rethinking Reports, page 3.1
This "rethinking reports" series of articles provides alternative research assignments that challenge students to think critically about historical actors.
By David Walbert and Melissa Thibault.
Alternatives to the President Report
In Rethinking Reports, page 1.1
The "President Report" is a common assignment in social studies classes from second grade, where biography is first introduced, through high school U.S. History. You know what we mean: students are asked to pick a U.S. president and write a biographical...
By Melissa Thibault and David Walbert.
Amadas and Barlowe explore the Outer Banks
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 4.5
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.1
On April 27, 1584, Captains Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe left the west coast of England in two ships to explore the North American coast for Sir Walter Raleigh. The party of explorers landed on July 13, 1584, on the North Carolina coast just north of Roanoke Island, and claimed the land in the name of Queen Elizabeth. Captain Barlowe's report describes the land and the people he encountered.
Format: journal/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Antislavery feeling in the mountains
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.12
In this excerpt from his book (1860), Frederick Law Olmsted describes his interactions with residents of the Appalachian region and their opinions on slavery. Includes historical commentary. Note: This source contains explicit language or content that requires mature discussion.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Archibald Murphey calls for better inland navigation
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.7
Excerpt from Archibald Murphey’s Report to the Committee on Inland Navigation in which he calls for the government to invest in the state’s internal transportation system as a way to break their dependency on neighboring states and to increase land values, population and state revenue.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Artillery fire
Artillery fire
As the British troops advance, Continental soldiers fire artillery in a reenactment of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse.
Format: image/photograph
Assessing the learning process
In Math for multiple intelligences, page 3
Assessment, like instruction, needs to be geared toward various learning styles, and teachers can create rubrics for ongoing assessment that keep a formal daily record of what students are learning.
Format: article
By Gretchen Buher and David Walbert.
Athletics
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.9
As the urban middle and working classes grew in the late nineteenth century, so did their desire for leisure activities. The result was a growth in sports and athletics. Includes early motion pictures of school athletics.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The battle begins
The battle begins
In a reenactment of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, Continental soldiers watch while British troops fire at American militia. The militia were ordered to fire twice, then break formation. Since militia were not professional soldiers, how well they obeyed...
Format: image/photograph
The Battle of Gettysburg
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.8
The diary of Confederate soldier Louis Leon in the first days of July 1863, describing his experiences at the Battle of Gettysburg. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
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