K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

Maren Wood is a research associate with LEARN NC’s North Carolina History Digital Textbook Project. She is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, having received a B.A. from the University of Lethbridge (Alberta, Canada) and an M.A. in British History from Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada. Her dissertation is titled Dangerous Liaisons: Narratives of Sexual Danger in the Anglo-American North, 1750 to 1820.

Resources created by L. Maren Wood

Air pollution
In Recent North Carolina, page 4.7
In 2006, the State of North Carolina sued the Tennessee Valley Authority in 2006 to force limits on emissions from power plants across the border in Tennessee. This newspaper article tells the story. Includes historical background.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Alice Caudle talks about mill work
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 7.5
WPA Federal Writers Project interview with a North Carolia woman about her life and work in textile mills in the early twentieth century. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
All hail to thee, thou good old state
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.8
A poem by Mary Bayard Devereux Clarke, North Carolina writer and editor, written in 1854. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poetry/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Amending the U.S. Constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.8
Text of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution, passed after the Civil War to abolish slavery and to guarantee the civil rights of African Americans.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Amnesty letters
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.5
Letters from North Carolinians to President Andrew Johnson asking for amnesty after the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Andrew Jackson calls for Indian removal
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.3
Excerpt from President Andrew Jackson's first inaugural address, 1829, in which he argued that American Indians should be removed west of the Mississippi. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Archibald Murphey calls for better inland navigation
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.7
Excerpt from Archibald Murphey’s Report to the Committee on Inland Navigation in which he calls for the government to invest in the state’s internal transportation system as a way to break their dependency on neighboring states and to increase land values, population and state revenue.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Archibald Murphey proposes a system of public education
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.6
Report of a joint legislative committee, 1817, laying out a complete plan for statewide public education, including primary schools, academies, and the University of North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Basic training
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.2
Oral history interview with a North Carolina man about his experiences after being drafted into the U.S. Army in 1942. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Battle of Bentonville
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.9
Memoir of a Confederate soldier describing the march to Bentonville and the battle there on March 19, 1865. He describes the desperate state of the Confederate army by the end of the war. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Battle of Gettysburg
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.8
The diary of Confederate soldier Louis Leon in the first days of July 1863, describing his experiences at the Battle of Gettysburg. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
The Battle of the Bulge
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.9
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.7
Oral history interview with a North Carolina World War II veteran about his experiences in the Battle of the Bulge, fought in France between December 1944 and January 1945. Includes historical background and contemporary newsreel footage.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
"Begging reduced to a system"
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.4
WPA life history of a North Carolina family living on welfare during the Great Depression. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Benjamin Wadsworth on the duties of children to their parents
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.10
Excerpt from a book by an eighteenth-century Puritan minister about expectations for children's behavior and respect for their parents. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A bilious fever
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.9
Excerpt from an 1850 novel in which the author describes the illness he succumbed to on a trip to Nag's Head. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A Bill to Prevent All Persons from Teaching Slaves to Read or Write, the Use of Figures Excepted (1830)
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.9
Law enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly, 1830. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Billy Graham and civil rights
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.9
An exchange of letters between the Reverend Billy Graham and President Dwight Eisenhower, March 1956, on the Church's role in civil rights. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Black businesses in Durham
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.7
Excerpt from a 1912 article by W. E. B. Du Bois praising Durham's black business community and the tolerance of their white counterparts. Includes historical and biographical background.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Black codes
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.9
Excerpts from the North Carolina Revised Code of 1855 with respect to free and enslaved African Americans, known as the "black codes." Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Black codes, 1866
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.6
Excerpts of legislation passed by the North Carolina General Assembly after the Civil War to limit the freedoms of former slaves. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
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