K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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James Leloudis is Associate Professor of History, Associate Dean for Honors, and Director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Professor Leloudis’ chief interest is the history of the modern South, with emphases on women, labor, education, race, and reform. He has published two books on these topics: Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World (co-authored with Jacquelyn Hall, Robert Korstad, Mary Murphy, Lu Ann Jones, and Christopher Daly), and Schooling the New South: Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880-1920. He currently has two new projects underway. The first is a study of race, politics, and leadership in the War on Poverty in the South. This work focuses on the North Carolina Fund, one of the most innovative state-level anti-poverty programs of the 1960s, and is based largely on oral history interviews with the Fund’s staff, clients, and student volunteers. The second project is an oral history study of school desegregation.

Resources created by James Leloudis

Life in the mill villages
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.3
By 1900, more than nine-tenths of textile workers lived in villages owned by the companies that employed them. Mill villages included stores, churches, and schools, but workers found ways to avoid too much dependence on their employers.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
Life on the land: The Piedmont before industrialization
In North Carolina in the New South, page 1.1
In the decades after the Civil War, commercial agriculture and industry made their way into the North Carolina Piedmont, requiring subsistence farmers to adapt their farms and their ways of life to new economic realities.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
Work and protest, 1920–1934
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 7.3
In response to declining demand in the 1920s, textile mill owners cut wages and demanded longer hours from their workers. Labor unrest increased, and there were widespread strikes from 1929 to 1934.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
Work in a textile mill
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.1
Article describes the various kinds of work in a textile mill, the experiences of millhands in and out of the mills, and what various workers earned.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
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