K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Jennifer Job

Pittleman Fellow

Jennifer Job joined LEARN NC as a research assistant and Pittleman Fellow in the fall of 2010. She received her B.A. in English from the College of Charleston and her M.A.T. in Secondary English Education from the University of North Carolina. Jennifer taught for four years in North Carolina and two years in Israel. She is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Education from UNC while also serving as the Managing Editor of The High School Journal.

When she is not reading for school, Jennifer spends her time traveling, reading silly historical fiction, and rock climbing. Her favorite times are spent on hiking trails with her dog, Lucy.

Resources created by Jennifer Job

Acceleration vs. social promotion in special education
Popular belief holds that accelerated programs are not good for gifted students. This article shows that these students actually excel with support from their teachers and parents.
Format: article
By Jennifer Job.
Alternative assessment
Alternative assessments measure performance in forms other than traditional paper-and-pencil, short answer tests. This article provides an extended explanation of alternative assessments, including a variety of examples.
Format: article
By Jennifer Job.
Can Americans define the term "learning disability?"
This article examines the statistics surrounding what Americans know — and don't know — about learning disabilities. The results highlight the necessity of educating parents and teachers more comprehensively about learning disabilities and what causes them.
Format: article
By Jennifer Job.
Changing the focus from label to need
Labeling a student's disability is an important step in procuring special education services for that student. But is there a downside to labeling students? This article looks at four commonly held — but ultimately misleading — beliefs about labels in special education, and advocates for focusing on needs rather than labels.
Format: article
By Jennifer Job.
Connecting oral history to geography: The changes of Madison County
In North Carolina maps, page 2.4
In this lesson, students ground the story of a county in corresponding maps. Students will show an understanding of the geography surrounding an oral history.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
Creating the biased image of the American Indian
In North Carolina maps, page 3.3
In this lesson, students use representations of Native Americans on maps from 1590-1800, as well as colonial narratives from that time period, to examine how the depictions and biases of the native cultures were formed. Students will analyze primary source documents for audience, tone, and positionality in their study. This lesson is ideal for an English language arts class or U.S. History class.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
The diagnosis of ADHD
Diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been on the rise since the 1990s. This article discusses the appropriate criteria under which ADHD should be diagnosed and considers the consequences of misdiagnosing — or not diagnosing — ADHD.
Format: article
By Jennifer Job.
Differentiation
Differentiation is the practice of tailoring instruction to diverse learners based on student readiness, interest, and learning styles. This article discusses the four areas in which teachers can differentiate instruction and includes links to resources that support differentiation.
Format: article
By Jennifer Job.
Discovering North Carolina: A colonial map webquest
In North Carolina maps, page 2.5
In this lesson, students engage in a webquest in which they take on the role of a seventeenth-century explorer commissioned by the King of England to collect information about the area he intends to call North Carolina. Through this activity, students identify the geographic aspects that influenced exploration and settlement and connect narratives with geographic locations for topics including discovery, Native Americans, and politics.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
Erosion in the Outer Banks
In North Carolina maps, page 3.2
In this lesson, students gain an understanding of the different perspectives on erosion in the Outer Banks over the past century by implementing research and map comparisons between Google Earth and early 20th century Coastal Maps.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Jennifer Job.
Gender in special education
Do boys have more incidences of disability than girls? The numbers suggest that they do, but the matter is complicated. This article addresses some of the issues behind the statistics.
Format: article
By Kris Zorigian and Jennifer Job.
Getting the facts about autism
This article explores some common misconceptions about autism.
Format: article
By Jennifer Job.
Ghosts and sea monsters: Analyzing mythology
In North Carolina maps, page 3.1
This lesson is meant to accompany a ninth or tenth grade unit covering myths and legends. In this lesson, students analyze sea creatures found in 16th and 17th century maps in terms of culture and context. They then search for stories relating to North Carolina legends, ending by writing a story of their own.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts)
By Jennifer Job.
How do special education students benefit from technology?
Students with disabilities can benefit greatly by using technology in the classroom. This article examines the use of assistive technologies with special education students.
Format: article
By Kris Zorigian and Jennifer Job.
The introduction of the car to North Carolina
In North Carolina maps, page 1.4
In this lesson, students look at the impact the introduction of the automobile had on North Carolina travel and city growth.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
An introduction to reading North Carolina maps
In North Carolina maps, page 1.2
In this lesson, students are introduced to the language of maps and why maps are important in our world. They are given the opportunity to read simple maps and find major features of more complicated maps.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1–3 Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
Learning on the go: The new age of handheld devices
Handheld devices open up a world of possibilities for the classroom. This article looks at types of handheld devices and discusses the benefits and challenges in teaching with them.
Format: article/best practice
By Jennifer Job.
Minority representation in special education classrooms
Are minority students over-represented in special education classrooms? The evidence suggests that they are. This article examines questions about minority representation in special education and suggests some strategies to address the issue.
Format: article
By Kris Zorigian and Jennifer Job.
My North Carolina
In North Carolina maps, page 1.3
Using word association and early maps of North Carolina, students will examine their preconceptions about the state and connect them to what they learn. This is intended to be used before any lesson about colonial times or discovery of America in general—the students can consider themselves "explorers" along with the ones they learn about.
Format: lesson plan
By Jennifer Job.
Native Americans in North Carolina
In North Carolina maps, page 2.6
In this lesson, students create a PowerPoint presentation giving the history and impact of one of the six major Native American tribes of North Carolina. They will show understanding of population movement, different perspectives, and the roles the Native Americans played in the development of the state.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
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