K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

Dr. Dirk Frankenberg was an internationally known professor of marine sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who spent the last 10 years of his career writing books about North Carolina’s natural beauty and helping to preserve it. Frankenberg led both UNC-CH’s Institute of Marine Sciences in Morehead City from 1980 to 1993 and its Marine Sciences Curriculum from 1974 to 1990. Before joining UNC-CH in 1974, he served on the University of Georgia faculty and was director of the National Science Foundation’s ocean sciences division from 1978 to 1980.

He was the author of several books, including The Nature of the Outer Banks and The Nature of North Carolina’s Southern Coast, and edited Exploring North Carolina’s Natural Areas, in which he and a large group of North Carolina naturalists introduced state residents and visitors to parks, nature preserves and hiking trails stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Appalachian Mountains.

He also served on numerous boards and commissions including the N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission, the N.C. Blue Ribbon Advisory Commission on Oysters and as chair of the Governor’s Advisory Committee on the North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences. Among his scientific interests were carbon in estuaries and among his educational efforts were promoting scientific careers among minorities and science and nature education on the web.

Dr. Frankenburg died in 2000 at the age of 62.

Resources created by Dirk Frankenberg

The “knees” of cypress
In Wetlands of the coastal plains, page 11
The other major adaptations of cypress and gums to flooded soils is their characteristic root extensions called “knees” shown in Figures 10 and 11. These structures are gas exchange systems within which oxygen from the air is conducted along the...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
The “knees” of Cypress
The “knees” of Cypress
Format: image/photograph
5 Year Intervals
5 Year Intervals
Format: image/photograph
Accreting Beach after Floyd
Accreting Beach after Floyd
Format: image/photograph
Acidic cove forest on a mountain creek
In Jocassee Gorges: Temperate rain forests of the Blue Ridge, page 11
The water that runs off the high slopes and off the Highlands Plateau is quickly organized into creeks and begins its descent towards the sea. The upper reaches of these creeks are too small to have great erosive power, but they can still carry sediments downstream...
By Dirk Frankenberg and Stephanie Walters.
Adaptation to frequent fires
In Wetlands of the coastal plains, page 4
In addition to fire-resistant bark, longleaf pines have a number of other adaptations to their frequent-fire habitat other than their fire resistant bark. For example, their seedlings have a growth cycle that helps them escape fires. After seeds are shed from...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
After the burn
In Forests and fires: The longleaf pine savanna, page 11
Figure 10 shows the forest after the controlled burn illustrated in Figures 8 and 9. There are now signs of wire grasses here because the stems have been burned, but the roots and rhizomes are alive and well under the soil surface. Look back at
By Dirk Frankenberg.
After the controlled burn
After the controlled burn
Format: image/photograph
Algae
In Jocassee Gorges: Temperate rain forests of the Blue Ridge, page 14
The rocks closest to the base of the falls get the heaviest spray. These rocks remain wet at all times and therefore make excellent places for the growth of attached algae. The green patches on the rocks shown in Figure 11 are algae. There are most obvious...
By Dirk Frankenberg and Stephanie Walters.
Ancient shoreline in Swansboro, NC
Ancient shoreline in Swansboro, NC
Format: image/photograph
Another overwash fan
In Small sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks, page 13
Figure 11 shows the last overwash fan on this trip, I promise. This one destroyed the dune over which this walkway was built and moved the sand landward to cover the walkway deck in the background. If you look closely you will see a change in color on the...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Back-barrier salt marsh
In Large sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks, page 6
Figure 5 shows the back-barrier salt marsh with a dune crest visible on the right and an area of maritime forest in the left background. This will allow you to confirm your estimate of the height of the dunes and the role these high dunes have in protecting...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Back-Barrier Salt Marsh
Back-Barrier Salt Marsh
Format: image/photograph
The Balds; Origins, Exposure, and Succession
The Balds; Origins, Exposure, and Succession
Format: image/photograph
The Balds; Origins, Exposure, and Succession
The Balds; Origins, Exposure, and Succession
Format: image/photograph
Bare knees
In Wetlands of the coastal plains, page 12
In this closeup we can see that the knee is specialized for gas exchange by having no bark, thereby providing the feature that gives the bald cypress its common name.
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Barrier island hotel
Barrier island hotel
Format: image/photograph
Beach accretion
In Hurricanes on sandy shorelines: Lessons for development, page 16
Figure 13 shows some more of the sand that was eroded off the Oak Island beach by Hurricane Floyd. It is a little hard to see, but if you look at the base of the stairs leading down from the deck of this house, you will see that sand covers at least the two...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Beach and berm
In Small sand volume barrier islands: Environmental processes and development risks, page 4
Figure 2 shows another view of the same rather dull topography of beach and berm. A little life can be seen in the middle background where pioneering sand dune plants have established a precarious roothold. In the left background you can see where sand has...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Beach and berm of Masonboro Island
Beach and berm of Masonboro Island
Format: image/photograph
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