K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Kathryn Walbert

Kathryn Walbert holds a Ph.D. in United States History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She directs LEARN NC’s efforts to develop instructor-led and self-guided materials for professional development in a range of topics in United States and North Carolina history. She has developed and taught online courses on “The Civil Rights Movement in Context” and “North Carolina American Indians.” She is also the author of several articles for LEARN NC, including a series on using oral history in the K-12 classroom and “Beyond Black History Month.”

A long-time associate of the Southern Oral History Program, Walbert has been using oral history in her own research and training others in the craft for over ten years. Her doctoral research focused on Southern women, both black and white, who became teachers after the Civil War, and the role of teaching in shaping their identities. From 2001 to 2003, she was an academic skills instructor at Duke University. She now serves as a consultant on U.S. history, oral history, and academic skills to LEARN NC and other organizations.

Resources created by Kathryn Walbert

The 2004 presidential election in historical context
Historian William E. Leuchtenburg talks about past presidential elections and how the 2004 election fits or defies precedents.
By Kathryn Walbert.
Andrew Jackson calls for Indian removal
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.3
Excerpt from President Andrew Jackson's first inaugural address, 1829, in which he argued that American Indians should be removed west of the Mississippi. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Beyond Black History Month
Go beyond approaches that marginalize African American history by "shifting the lens" to look at events from new perspectives.
By Kathryn Walbert.
Cherokee language recordings
In Teaching about North Carolina American Indians, page 3.4
While many North Carolina students have heard languages from some parts of the world spoken in the context of their daily lives – Spanish, French, or Chinese, for example – they may not have heard American Indian languages and, as a result, do not know...
Format: bibliography/teacher's guide
By Myrtle Driver, Kevin Norris, and Kathryn Walbert.
Chief John Ross protests the Treaty of New Echota
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.7
In this 1836 letter, Cherokee Chief John Ross urges Congress not to ratify the Treaty of New Echota, in which a small group of Cherokee men claiming to represent the Nation agreed to removal. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Common grackle
Common grackle
This grackle is perched in a dogwood tree. From the side, its yellow eye is visible, and its iridescent blue head feathers and purple wing feathers stand out against the black.
Format: image/photograph
Common grackle
Common grackle
This grackle, black with its metallic blue head feathers barely visible, is perched in a dogwood tree. Its mouth is open, calling.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly
After emerging from the chrysalis, the butterfly must wait for its wings to dry before flying.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly
A few hours after it emerges from the chrysalis, the butterfly's wings are dry, and it is ready to fly away.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Chrysalis
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Chrysalis
With the front part of its body suspended by a pair of threads from the underside of a plant stem, the butterfly larva becomes a chrysalis.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Chrysalis
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Chrysalis
This chrysalis is green to match the leaf to which it is attached.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Chrysalis with adult butterfly ready to emerge
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Chrysalis with adult butterfly ready to emerge
Before the adult butterfly emerges, the chrysalis becomes papery and translucent.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Egg, day 1
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Egg, day 1
The egg of an eastern black swallowtail butterfly (Papilo polyxenes) shortly after it has been laid. The leaves are parsley, which is one of a few plants eaten by the larva.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Egg, day 7
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Egg, day 7
On the seventh day after the egg is laid, the butterfly larva is visible inside the egg.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Emerging from chrysalis
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Emerging from chrysalis
The butterfly, just emerged from its chrysalis, must wait for its wings to dry before it can fly.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: First larval instar
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: First larval instar
The first larval instar (first stage of the caterpillar) is shown here a day after hatching.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Forming a chrysalis
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Forming a chrysalis
The larva attaches itself by a pair of threads to the underside of a stick, branch, or leaf, and assumes a C-shape as it prepares to form a chrysalis.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Larva emerging from egg, day 7
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Larva emerging from egg, day 7
The butterfly larva (caterpillar) emerges from the egg about seven days after the egg was laid.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Larva, first instar, day 1 after hatching
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Larva, first instar, day 1 after hatching
The first larval instar, or stage of the caterpillar, looks nothing like the later stages.
Format: image/photograph
Records 1–20 of 59 displayed: go to page 1, 2, 3