K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Kathryn Walbert

Kathryn Walbert holds a Ph.D. in United States History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She directs LEARN NC’s efforts to develop instructor-led and self-guided materials for professional development in a range of topics in United States and North Carolina history. She has developed and taught online courses on “The Civil Rights Movement in Context” and “North Carolina American Indians.” She is also the author of several articles for LEARN NC, including a series on using oral history in the K-12 classroom and “Beyond Black History Month.”

A long-time associate of the Southern Oral History Program, Walbert has been using oral history in her own research and training others in the craft for over ten years. Her doctoral research focused on Southern women, both black and white, who became teachers after the Civil War, and the role of teaching in shaping their identities. From 2001 to 2003, she was an academic skills instructor at Duke University. She now serves as a consultant on U.S. history, oral history, and academic skills to LEARN NC and other organizations.

Resources created by Kathryn Walbert

Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Second larval instar
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Second larval instar
The second larval instar, or stage of the caterpillar, develops the familiar stripes and markings. This larva is seven days out of the egg.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Second larval instar
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Second larval instar
The larva clings to the stem of a parsley plant. Although butterfly and moth caterpillars appear to have many legs, as insects, they have only six true legs -- visible here just behind the larva's head.
Format: image
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instage
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instage
Here, the larva's maturing structure is visible. The larva is now 10 days out of the egg.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instage
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instage
As it grows, the larva is able to move easily from plant to plant in search of more food, as it does here.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instage
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instage
Fourteen days out of the egg, the larva leaves its food source in search of a place to pupate (become a chrysalis).
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instar
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instar
In its third instar (growth stage), the eastern black swallowtail caterpillar takes on its familiar black and green stripes and yellow eye spots.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instar
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instar
The larva on a flowering parsley plant.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instar
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instar
Closeup of the head of the eastern black swallowtail larva, a day before entering its pupal stage. As a defense mechanism, the red markings and yellow "horns" on its head become more prominent when the larva is threatened.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instar
Eastern black swallowtail butterfly: Third larval instar
Thirteen days out of the egg, the larva is growing rapidly.
Format: image/photograph
Eastern gray squirrel
Eastern gray squirrel
Format: image/photograph
"A female raid" in 1863: Using newspaper coverage to learn about North Carolina's Civil War homefront
In this lesson plan, students will use original newspaper coverage to learn about a raid on local stores by Confederate soldier's wives in March 1863 in Salisbury, North Carolina, and use that historical moment to explore conscription, life on the homefront, economic issues facing North Carolina merchants, the challenges of wartime politics, and the role of newspaper editors in shaping public opinion.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
"For What Is a Mother Responsible?"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.5
1845 newspaper editorial about a mother's responsibilities for her children's education and character. Includes historical commentary.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert.
"For What Is a Mother Responsible?" -- Idealized motherhood vs. the realities of motherhood in antebellum North Carolina
In this lesson for grade 8, students analyze a newspaper article about motherhood from a North Carolina newspaper in 1845 and compare it to descriptions of motherhood from other contemporary sources. Students will also compare these antebellum descriptions to the modern debates over mothers' roles in American society.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
History and literature on trial
In Alternative discussion formats, page 3
In Educator's Guides: North Carolina Digital History, page 4.3
Putting historical or literary figures on trial makes a lively and challenging alternative to a class debate.
Format: activity
By Kathryn Walbert.
Incorporating oral history into the K–12 curriculum
In Oral history in the classroom, page 3
Oral history techniques for use with students at all levels, from kindergarten through high school.
Format: article
By Kathryn Walbert.
The Indian Removal Act of 1830
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.5
Act of Congress, passed in 1830, authorizing President Andrew Jackson to transfer Eastern Indian tribes to the territories west of the Mississippi River. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert, L. Maren Wood, and David Walbert.
Life in the mill villages
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.3
By 1900, more than nine-tenths of textile workers lived in villages owned by the companies that employed them. Mill villages included stores, churches, and schools, but workers found ways to avoid too much dependence on their employers.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
Life on the land: The Piedmont before industrialization
In North Carolina in the New South, page 1.1
In the decades after the Civil War, commercial agriculture and industry made their way into the North Carolina Piedmont, requiring subsistence farmers to adapt their farms and their ways of life to new economic realities.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
Monuments and memorials
In Alternative discussion formats, page 5
In Educator's Guides: North Carolina Digital History, page 4.5
Creating monuments or memorials for historical and literary figures encourages students to think creatively and provides a lively structure for an in-class discussion.
Format: activity
By Kathryn Walbert.
Mountain dialect: Reading between the spoken lines
This lesson plan uses Chapter 13 of Our Southern Highlanders as a jumping-off point to help students achieve social studies and English language arts objectives while developing an appreciation of the uniqueness of regional speech patterns, the complexities of ethnographic encounter, and the need to interrogate primary sources carefully to identify potential biases and misinformation in them. Historical content includes American slavery, the turn of the century, and the Great Depression.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
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