K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Resources tagged with slavery and African Americans are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

An account of the slave trade on the coast of Africa
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.6
Excerpt from a book by a former surgeon on a slave ship, describing the horrors of the Middle Passage from Africa to America. Historical commentary is included. Warning: This document may not be suitable for all ages. Please use discretion.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Shane Freeman.
African American spirituals
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.2
Excerpt from Frederick Douglass' autobiography in which he describes the purpose and effect of spirituals for enslaved people. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
African and African American storytelling
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.7
The advent of slavery led to changes in the tradition of African storytelling. Tales in Africa had once featured the lion, elephant, and hyena; African tales in America began to star the rabbit, fox, and bear. To the African in slavery, the Brer Rabbit tales became a source of identity.
Format: article
By Madafo Lloyd Wilson.
Africans before captivity
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.1
Most Africans who came to North America were from West Africa and West Central Africa. This article describes some of the cultures and history of those regions prior to the beginning of the slave trade.
Format: article
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
A Bill to Prevent All Persons from Teaching Slaves to Read or Write, the Use of Figures Excepted (1830)
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.9
Law enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly, 1830. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Catherine Edmondston and Reconstruction
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.7
Excerpts from the diary of Catherine Edmonston of Halifax County, North Carolina, 1865–66, in which she describes her frustration with emancipation and her family's attempts to control its former slaves. Includes historical commentary. Note: This source contains explicit language or content that requires mature discussion.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Death of an Old Carriage Horse
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.11
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 9.4
Poem by George Moses Horton. Includes historical and literary commentary.
Format: poetry/primary source
By George Moses Horton.
Elizabeth, A Colored Minister of the Gospel, Born in Slavery
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 3.9
In this excerpt from her 1863 memoir, Elizabeth (her last name, if she had one, is unknown), a former slave, tells of her conversion to Christianity and her work as a minister. She faced opposition to her ministry both because she was African American and because she was a woman. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
The Emancipation Proclamation
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.6
Proclamation issued by President Abraham Lincoln, January 1, 1863, freeing slaves in states or parts thereof then in rebellion against the United States. Includes historical commentary.
Format: proclamation/primary source
"Fear of Insurrection"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 9.3
Excerpt from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs, in which the author recalls the hysteria in Edenton, North Carolina, after Nat Turner's Rebellion. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
A forced migration
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.3
The first Africans, brought to America through forced migration, came as indentured servants to Jamestown, Virginia, in 1619. Africans brought to the colonies in later years were bought and sold as slaves. At the time of the American Revolution, most of the enslaved people in North Carolina lived in the eastern part of the colony and the majority lived on large plantations, where their work was critical to the state’s cash crops and economy.
Format: article
By Jennifer Farley.
The Gospel Train
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.3
Audio and lyrics of an African American spiritual. Includes historical commentary.
Format: music/primary source
History of a scout
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 8.2
Account of a slave who escaped from a plantation in Jones County, North Carolina, to Union lines during the Civil War and served as a scout for the Union army. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Horrid Massacre in Virginia
Horrid Massacre in Virginia
Composite of scenes of Nat Turner's rebellion. Caption reads: The Scenes which the above Plate is designed to repesent are -- Fig. 1. A Mother intreating for the lives of her Children. -- 2. Mr Travis, cruelly murdered by his own Slaves. -- 3....
Format: image/illustration
I'm Gwine Home on de Mornin' Train
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.4
Audio and lyrics of an African American spiritual. Includes historical commentary.
Format: music/primary source
The importance of rice to North Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.2
Rice was a very profitable crop in the late 1600s. People in foreign lands were already familiar with it, and it was gaining popularity as a food for the growing slave trade. Rice production helped support North Carolina's economy for many years, relying largely on slave labor. The abolition of slavery marked the beginning of the end of rice plantations in North Carolina.
Format: article
By Keri Towery.
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 3.10
Excerpt from the book by Harriet Jacobs, describing her master's attempts to exploit her sexually and her mistress' response to the situation. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Interview with Charlie Barbour
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 3.2
Federal Writers Project interview with former slave Charlie Barbour. Includes historical commentary. Note: This source contains explicit language or content that requires mature discussion.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.