K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Resources tagged with slavery and abolitionism are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Antislavery feeling in the mountains
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.12
In this excerpt from his book (1860), Frederick Law Olmsted describes his interactions with residents of the Appalachian region and their opinions on slavery. Includes historical commentary. Note: This source contains explicit language or content that requires mature discussion.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
A divided nation
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.5
During the 1850s, the issue of slavery severed the political bonds that had held the United States together. The rise of abolitionism, renewed conflict over the expansion of slavery into the western territories, and the Dred Scott decision all pushed the nation closer to civil war.
Format: article
From proslavery to secession
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.1
Between 1830 and 1860, as abolitionism grew in the North, southerners largely stopped questioning the wisdom of slavery and argued strongly for extending it.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Furor over Hinton Helper's book
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.9
Description by historian John Spencer Bassett (1898) of the response in North Carolina to Hinton Helper's The Impending Crisis of the South, in which Helper argued against slavery. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
The impending crisis of the South
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.8
Excerpt from Hinton Helper's 1857 book arguing against slavery on the grounds that it kept the South subservient to the North and hurt poor whites. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Levi Coffin and the Underground Railroad
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.5
A brief history of the Underground Railroad, an informal connection of people and homes across the United States that helped fugitive slaves reach safety in the North and elsewhere. Includes a discussion of the role of North Carolina native Levi Coffin.
Format: book
By L. Maren Wood.
The Quakers and anti-slavery
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.4
In this excerpt from his memoirs, Levi Coffin describes the early abolition movement in North Carolina and the tensions among abolitionists over the best way to free slaves. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Reminiscences of Levi Coffin: The story of Jack Barnes
A chapter from the memoir of Levi Coffin, a Quaker abolitionist who was heavily involved in the Underground Railroad in the 19th century.
Format: book (multiple pages)
UNC dismisses Benjamin Hedrick
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.7
Minutes of a meeting of University of North Carolina faculty in which they agreed to the dismissal of professor Benjamin Hedrick, who had published his views supporting the Republican candidate for President.
Format: document/primary source