K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

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A cotton mill superintendent's house
A cotton mill superintendent's house
Photograph of a cotton mill superintendent's house (cost $1500) from an 1899 textbook on cotton mill management.
Format: image/photograph
A four-room mill house with gable
A four-room mill house with gable
Format: image/diagram
A three-room narrow mill house
A three-room narrow mill house
Format: image/photograph
A two-room mill house
A two-room mill house
Format: image/photograph
Andrew Jackson calls for Indian removal
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.3
Excerpt from President Andrew Jackson's first inaugural address, 1829, in which he argued that American Indians should be removed west of the Mississippi. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
AOWS6: Revolution, reaction, reform: Industrialization creates a modern world
This online professional development course takes the concept of revolution away from war and links it to a major change in society using the late 19th and early 20th century Industrial Revolution and following Progressive Era.
Format: article/online course
Beyond Black History Month
Go beyond approaches that marginalize African American history by "shifting the lens" to look at events from new perspectives.
By Kathryn Walbert.
Bonsack cigarette rolling machine
Bonsack cigarette rolling machine
Format: image/photograph
Brevard Station Museum
This museum provides a collection of interesting stories, facts, recollections, pictures and tidbits relating to the history of Stanley, Gaston County, North Carolina.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Cities and public architecture
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.7
In this activity, students compare photographs of public buildings in Charlotte before and after industrialization and the growth of the city in the late nineteenth century to learn about industrial wealth and the culture of the Gilded Age.
Format: article
Conduct your own oral history project
In this unit, students will research the moviegoing experience in the early 20th century by analyzing primary sources. They will then conduct oral history interviews to learn about what it was like to go to the movies in various generations.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 and 12 Social Studies)
By Lisa Speaker.
Cooleemee's Textile Heritage Center
This historic center was built so that the people of the Carolina mill industry would not be forgotten. The center celebrates and strives to preserve their values and their way of life to share with future generations.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Cotton mill workers, c. 1899
Cotton mill workers, c. 1899
A "Group of Southern Cotton Mill Operatives" poses for an 1899 textbook about cotton mill operations.
Format: image/photograph
Growth and transformation: The United States in the Gilded Age
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.1
Between the Civil War and the First World War, industry and cities grew at a tremendous pace in the United States.
Format: article
Henry Grady and the "New South"
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.2
Excerpt from a speech by Atlanta journalist and editor Henry Grady, praising the South's recovery from the Civil War, advocating industrial development, and inviting cooperation between North and South. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
How the twenties roared in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.2
Brief history of North Carolina during the 1920s, when growth in cities, industry, and commerce changed people's lives -- though not always for the better.
Format: article
By Elizabeth Gillespie McRae.
Immigration in U.S. history
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.5
Tens of millions of immigrants over four centuries have made the United States what it is today. They came to make new lives and livelihoods in the New World; their hard work benefited themselves and their new home country.
Format: article
Industrialization and Progressive Reform in the Craft Revival
In this lesson plan, originally published on the Craft Revival website, students will analyze the process of making a hobby into a job. They will explore Craft Revival work environments, representations of industrial work environments, and data regarding Craft Revival work. To close the activity, students write a journal entry comparing Craft Revival and industrial work experiences.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 Social Studies)
By Patrick Velde.
Industrialization in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.7
Industrialization needed five things -- capital, labor, raw materials, markets, and transportation -- and in the 1870s, North Carolina had all of them. This article explains the process of industrialization in North Carolina, with maps of factory and railroad growth.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Krispy Kreme
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.11
On July 13, 1937, the first Krispy Kreme store opened for business in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The company's success and quick rise to popularity were due both to the personal history of Vernon Rudolph, its owner, and the larger cultural history of doughnuts in America (and more specifically, the American South).
Format: article