K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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"For us the war is ended"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.14
Order issued by the Union general in command of occupied North Carolina, April 1865, announcing the end of hostilities, promising fair treatment, and setting rules for citizens. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
"He never wanted land till now"
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.7
WPA interview with an elderly African American man about his experiences during the Great Depression. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
"Shew Yourselves to be Freemen"
To the inhabitants of the Province of North-Carolina. Dear Brethren, Nothing is more common than for Persons who look upon themselves to be injured than to resent and complain. These are sounded aloud,...
Format: pamphlet/primary source
"Some grievous oppressions"
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.4
Excerpt of a sermon published by Herman Husband, Regulator leader, in 1770. Husband argued that North Carolina's colonial government was unfair to small farmers. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
"The school houses are crowded, and the people are clamorous for more"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 8.4
American Freedmen's Union Commission pamphlet explaining the Commission's work in educating formerly enslaved African Americans after the Civil War. Includes historical commentary. Note: This source contains explicit language or content that requires mature discussion.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
"We have unexpectedly become civilized"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 4.3
Letter from citizens of Turkey Town in the Cherokee Phoenix and Indians' Advocate, 1829, opposing relocation. The authors pointed out the irony that even after becoming "civilized" as white people had claimed to want, they were nevertheless being pushed off their land. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
1835 amendments to the North Carolina Constitution
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.3
Amendments to the North Carolina state constitution passed in 1835. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
1924 Virginia Health Bulletin
1924 Virginia Health Bulletin
Virginia Health Bulletin announcing the Racial Integrity Act, 1924. The act, administered by Virginia state official Walter Plecker, sought to prevent interracial marriage, and made it illegal for people to identify their race as Indian. The full text of the...
Format: image/document
A Brief Description of the Province of Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.8
A pamphlet produced in 1660s London at the request of the Lords Proprietors described the economic opportunity and religious freedom available to settlers in Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
A call for independence
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.9
After the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, North Carolina's fourth Provincial Congress met at Halifax in April 1776, and resolved that the colony's delegates to the Continental Congress should support a move to declare independence.
Format: article
A cemetery in Kalaupapa, Malokai, HI
A cemetery in Kalaupapa, Malokai, HI
A cemetery in Kalaupapa, Molokai, HI. A prominent grave is surrounded by a railing and is covered with white flowers. The cemetery is encircled by a low wall of stacked stones. The five-square mile Kalaupapa Peninsula is located on the larger Makanalua Peninsula....
Format: image/photograph
A cemetery in Kalaupapa, Molokai, HI
A cemetery in Kalaupapa, Molokai, HI
A cemetery in Kalaupapa, Molokai, Hawaii. These graves are topped by a stone cap and a grave marker. Many of the other graves on the peninsula remain unmarked. The five-square mile Kalaupapa Peninsula is located on the larger Makanalua Peninsula. A rich and...
Format: image/photograph
A Declaration and Proposals of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.6
Initial plans by the Lords Proprietors for settling and governing the province of Carolina. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: declaration/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
A divided nation
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.5
During the 1850s, the issue of slavery severed the political bonds that had held the United States together. The rise of abolitionism, renewed conflict over the expansion of slavery into the western territories, and the Dred Scott decision all pushed the nation closer to civil war.
Format: article
A hiking trail to Kaluapapa Peninsula, Molokai, HI
A hiking trail to Kaluapapa Peninsula, Molokai, HI
A hiking trail to Kaluapapa Peninsula, Molokai, HI. The trail is carpeted on either side by lush plant growth. The five-square mile Kalauapa Peninsula is located on the larger Makanalua Peninsula. A rich and beautiful landscape, it was home for almost 1,000...
Format: image/photograph
A little kingdom in Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.3
The original vision for Carolina was a feudal province in which eight "Lords Proprietors" would have nearly royal power, but with an elected assembly and guarantees of religious freedom.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
A nene, or Hawaiian goose, in Haleakala National Park, HI
A nene, or Hawaiian goose, in Haleakala National Park, HI
A Nene, also known as the Hawaiian goose, at Haleakala National Park, Hawaii. The Nene, a fairly close descendant of the more common Canada goose, is an endangered species, with only about 800 birds existing in the wild. The species almost went extinct in...
Format: image/photograph
A perspective on inquiry
In this interview, Norman Budnitz, cofounder of the Center for Inquiry Based Learning, talks about inquiry and how to teach with it in a K–12 classroom.
Format: article/best practice
By Waverly Harrell.
A Pledge to Violate the Stamp Act
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 2.5
In 1766, during the colonial protests of the Stamp Act, some residents of eastern North Carolina, including many colonial leaders, signed this pledge to refuse to pay the tax. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
A proprietary colony: Exploring the Charter of Carolina
In this lesson for grade 8, students will examine the 1663 Charter of Carolina and complete a graphic organizer exploring the elements of the Charter. Students will then write a letter to the King of England from the perspective of one of the Lords Proprietors.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.