K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

ATTENTION USERS

LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

Didn't find what you were looking for?

A four-room mill house with gable
A four-room mill house with gable
Format: image/diagram
A three-room narrow mill house
A three-room narrow mill house
Format: image/photograph
A two-room mill house
A two-room mill house
Format: image/photograph
An industry representative visits Loray Mills
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.3
Article from the Charlotte Observer during the Loray Mill strike in Gastonia, 1929. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Child labor in North Carolina's textile mills
The photographs of Lewis Hine show the lives and work of children in North Carolina's textile mill villages in the first decades of the twentieth century.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Children at work: Exposing child labor in the cotton mills of the Carolinas
In this lesson, students will learn about the use of child labor in the cotton mills of the Carolinas during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They will learn what life was like for a child worker and then write an investigative news report exposing the practice of child labor in the mills, using quotations from oral histories with former child mill workers and photographs of child laborers taken by social reform photographer Lewis Hine.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Hanes spinning plant and mill village, 1910
Hanes spinning plant and mill village, 1910
P. H. Hanes spinning plant and mill village on the Clemmons Road, 1910. Photo shows a few of the new homes in the village. The company store is at left. Road later known as South Stratford Road.
Format: image/photograph
Ila Hartsell Dodson oral history excerpt (child labor)
Ila Hartsell Dodson was born in 1907 in South Carolina and began working in the Brandon Cotton Mill at age 14. Her mother, father, and all of her nine siblings worked for various cotton mills in North and South Carolina. She met her husband working in the...
Format: audio/interview
Ila Hartsell Dodson oral history excerpt (labor unions)
Ila Hartsell Dodson was born in 1907 in South Carolina and began working in the Brandon Cotton Mill at age 14. Her mother, father, and all of her nine siblings worked for various cotton mills in North and South Carolina. She met her husband working in the...
Format: audio/interview
Industrialization in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.7
Industrialization needed five things -- capital, labor, raw materials, markets, and transportation -- and in the 1870s, North Carolina had all of them. This article explains the process of industrialization in North Carolina, with maps of factory and railroad growth.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Labor unions in the cotton mills
In this lesson, students will learn about the labor union movement in the U.S. by listening to oral histories, and they will then deliver a persuasive speech arguing for or against unionization.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Life in the mill villages
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.3
By 1900, more than nine-tenths of textile workers lived in villages owned by the companies that employed them. Mill villages included stores, churches, and schools, but workers found ways to avoid too much dependence on their employers.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
Mill village and factory: Voices
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.5
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 5.2
Excerpts of oral history interviews with men and women who lived in mill villages and worked in textile mills in the early twentieth century.
Format: interview/primary source
Mill villages
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.4
Excerpt from D. A. Tompkins' 1899 textbook for cotton mill owners, explaining rationale and design for millworkers' housing. Includes photographs, plans, and historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Plan for a two-room mill house
Plan for a two-room mill house
Format: image/diagram
Plans for a four-room mill house with gable
Plans for a four-room mill house with gable
Format: image/diagram
Plans for a three-room narrow mill house
Plans for a three-room narrow mill house
Format: image/diagram