K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Hanoi market women talking
There was an outdoor market across from my hotel in Hanoi, Vietnam. Though it was not large, it was possible to find anything from combs to shoes to fresh meat and vegetables. Merchants line up in long rows, selling their merchandise from a blanket on the...
Format: audio
"A female raid" in 1863: Using newspaper coverage to learn about North Carolina's Civil War homefront
In this lesson plan, students will use original newspaper coverage to learn about a raid on local stores by Confederate soldier's wives in March 1863 in Salisbury, North Carolina, and use that historical moment to explore conscription, life on the homefront, economic issues facing North Carolina merchants, the challenges of wartime politics, and the role of newspaper editors in shaping public opinion.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
"Begging reduced to a system"
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.4
WPA life history of a North Carolina family living on welfare during the Great Depression. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
"Chips" ahoy!
This lesson will help children recognize, continue, and create number patterns, as well as find the rules for the patterns. The activities progress from concrete to semi-concrete to abstract.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 Mathematics)
By Terri Downing.
"Civil Disobedience" excerpt seminar
This lesson plan is to be used for a seminar on an excerpt of Henry David Thoreau's work, "Civil Disobedience." The plan will follow the Paideia concept to discuss the great ideas of the text. The plan will provide a pre-guide activity, coaching activity, inner circle seminar questions, outer circle questions and a post writing assignment.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Francis Bryant.
"Der Handschuh" by Friedrich Schiller
Students will have the opportunity to explore the poem, “Der Handschuh,” through shared reading, shared writing, and phonemic strategies that lead to fluency and comprehension.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Thomas Skinner.
"Eastern North Carolina for the farmer"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.3
Pamphlet published by the Atlantic Coast Line railroad in 1916, advertising eastern North Carolina as a place for people from other parts of the country to settle. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
"Eggs-tra" special sounds
Students will identify, compare, and classify the sounds made by plastic eggs filled with rice, pebbles, and salt. They will graph the results of their discoveries. They will then compose and tape sound pieces illustrating dynamic levels they discovered. Finally they will construct their own "maraca" using plastic eggs.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1–2 Music Education)
By Sondra Edwards.
"For What Is a Mother Responsible?"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.5
1845 newspaper editorial about a mother's responsibilities for her children's education and character. Includes historical commentary.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert.
"For What Is a Mother Responsible?" -- Idealized motherhood vs. the realities of motherhood in antebellum North Carolina
In this lesson for grade 8, students analyze a newspaper article about motherhood from a North Carolina newspaper in 1845 and compare it to descriptions of motherhood from other contemporary sources. Students will also compare these antebellum descriptions to the modern debates over mothers' roles in American society.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
"He never wanted land till now"
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.7
WPA interview with an elderly African American man about his experiences during the Great Depression. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
"Home folks and neighbor people"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.4
This page is an excerpt from Horace Kephart's book Our Southern Highlanders, about the relationships between the people of the North Carolina mountains and their natural environment. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
"I Spy": Using adjectives and descriptive phrases
Students will review definitions for adjectives, learn and practice sensory adjectives and imagery, and use adjectives and descriptive phrases in writing a paragraph and/or story.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 English Language Arts)
By Elizabeth Hutchens.
"Land and Work in Carolina" teaching strategies
A variety of suggested activities for use with an article that explains the key elements of feudalism, with a focus on how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
"Liberty to slaves": The black response
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.4
During the American Revolution, some black people living in the colonies fought for the British and some fought for the revolutionaries. Their actions during the war were often decided by what they believed would best help them throw off the shackles of slavery. Most believed that victory by the British would bring an end to their enslavement.
Format: article
By Jeffrey J. Crow.
"Luscious lollipops" and other adjectives
The students will become familiar with adjectives by reading Ruth Heller's book Many Luscious Lollipops: A Book About Adjectives. They will also be able to use adjectives to describe an object in their own writing.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–1 English Language Arts)
By Pat DeMello.
"Mice" in the Media Center
This lesson plan will foster literature appreciation in the Elementary School through sharing a variety of books (fiction and non-fiction) poems, puppets or models, focusing on a mouse or mice as a main character or characters.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1 Information Skills)
"My dear I ha'n't forgot you"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.1
Letter from Elizabeth Watson to her husband, James, a Confederate solider in the Civil War, telling him news from home and how much she misses him. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
"No one has anything to sell"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.8
Diary of Julia Johnson Fisher, a Georgia woman, in March and April 1864, in which she describes the difficulty finding food and other necessities during the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
"Shew Yourselves to be Freemen"
To the inhabitants of the Province of North-Carolina. Dear Brethren, Nothing is more common than for Persons who look upon themselves to be injured than to resent and complain. These are sounded aloud,...
Format: pamphlet/primary source