K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

Deaf culture
The socialization of deaf students with other deaf students where American Sign Language is used for communication.

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Harvey B. Gantt Center for African- American Arts + Culture
This cultural center was created to preserve the visual and performing arts heritages of African-Americans and other minorities. The Center has an art gallery with “over 100 works of art from renowned artists such as Elizabeth Catlett, Romare Bearden, John Biggers.” It also offers art classes to all age groups.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Alternatives to the famous person report
In Rethinking Reports, page 3.1
This "rethinking reports" series of articles provides alternative research assignments that challenge students to think critically about historical actors.
By David Walbert and Melissa Thibault.
Learning literary elements through African and African American folktales
In this eighth grade lesson, students will apply their knowledge of literary elements (plot structure and archetypal characters) to the analysis and creation of African and African American folktales. Students will work in groups to read several picture book versions of African and African American folktales. Each group then creates a plot map for a story and highlights other literary elements identified within the text. Students then compare the folktales with fairy tales from other cultures and explain what they learned about African and African American culture from reading the folktales. Finally, students work independently to write their own modern-day folktale.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–9 English Language Arts)
By Hardin Engelhardt.
Museum of the Cape Fear
This museum interprets the history and culture of southern North Carolina from prehistory to the present.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Current events in Africa
In this lesson for grade seven, students find two news stories about a current event in Africa: one from an American media source and one from an African media source. Students compare the two to gain an understanding of cultural bias and perspective.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7 English Language Arts, Information Skills, and Social Studies)
By Shane Freeman.
African American English
In this activity, students learn about the history of African American English and the meaning of dialect and linguistic patterns. Students watch a video about African American English and analyze the dialect's linguistic patterns.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Hannah Askin.
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Africans before captivity: Graphic organizer
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an article about the regions of Africa from which most American slaves originated. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer a series of questions.
Format: worksheet/lesson plan (grade 9–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Jonkonnu celebrations in North Carolina and beyond
In this lesson plan, students read two articles about Jonkonnu, an African American and Afro-Caribbean celebration among slave populations with origins in West Africa. Students complete a graphic organizer comparing Jonkonnu in North Carolina, Belize, and Jamaica.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 and 11 Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
When teachers don't understand
Teaching should be informed not only by the content of the discipline but also by the lives of the students.
Format: article
By Bobby Hobgood, Ed.D..
Revolutionary North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the era of the American Revolution. Topics include the Regulators, the resistance to Great Britain, the War for Indpendence, and the creation of new governments.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
African American history to 1950
This course explores African American history in the contexts of United States, North Carolina, and world history.
Format: article/online course
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
Making the most of culture kits
Culture kits — everyday objects from the country or region you're studying — can bring your lessons to life. This article will get you started using culture kits in your social studies classroom and gives contacts for borrowing culture kits from programs at UNC and Duke.
Format: article/best practice
By Regina Higgins.
Beyond Black History Month
Go beyond approaches that marginalize African American history by "shifting the lens" to look at events from new perspectives.
By Kathryn Walbert.
African American history
A guide to lesson plans, articles, and websites to help bring African American history alive in your classroom.
Format: bibliography/help