K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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We have a story to tell: Native peoples of the Chesapeake region
Readings and lesson plans exploring the historical and ongoing challenges faced by the American Indians of the Chesapeake Bay region, since the time of their first contact with Europeans in the early 1600s.
Format: series (multiple pages)
Excavating Occaneechi Town: An archaeology primer
Republished with permission from the Research Laboratories of Archaeology, the Archaeology Primer uses photographs of the excavations at Occaneechi Town to introduce fundamental concepts of archaeology. The primer provides an introduction to the methods of archaeology and to some common types of artifacts, and prepares students to participate in an electronic archaeological dig.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
The Piedmont's first human inhabitants
In Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use, page 2
The first human inhabitants of the Piedmont to make use of its clays were the American Indians. People who lived along the banks of the Potomac and Savannah Rivers discovered the seemingly miraculous transformation of mud into stone by heat about 4500 years...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use
A “virtual field trip” through the North Carolina Piedmont and thousands of years of history explains the origin of Piedmont clays and how clay is made into pottery. With high-resolution photographs.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Burial urns
Figure 5 shows some of the largest pots recovered from the Town Creek site. These are burial urns for infants.
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Teaching about North Carolina American Indians
This web edition is drawn from a teachers institute curriculum enrichment project on North Carolina American Indian Studies conducted by the North Carolina Humanities Council. Resources include best practices for teaching about American Indians, suggestions for curriculum integration, webliographies, and lesson plans about North Carolina American Indians.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Anticipation guide: The importance of one simple plant
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.9
This activity is designed to be used with the article "The Importance of One Simple Plant." A series of true/false statements will enable students to compare what they previously knew about maize with what they've learned by reading the article.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Frisco Native American Museum and Natural History Center
The center has wonderful exhibits which explain the importance of the Native American people of North America as well as artifacts of the first inhabitants of Hatteras Island.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
The fate of North Carolina's native peoples: Causes and effects
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an article about changes in the population of North Carolina in the early 1700s as European settlers displaced American Indians. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer a series of questions.
Format: worksheet/lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Sir Walter Raleigh and South America
Short explanatory passages written for students about the life of Sir Walter Raleigh, specifically as it pertains to the history of South America.
Format: series (multiple pages)
Two worlds: Educator's guide
Lesson plans and activities to be used with "Two Worlds: Prehistory, Contact, and the Lost Colony" -- the first part of a North Carolina history textbook for secondary students.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Museum of the Native American Resource Center
The exhibits on display at this museum include prehistoric tools and weapons, 19th century Lumbee artifacts, contemporary Indian art and items which represent Native Americans from all over North America.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Graphic organizer: Who owns the land?
This graphic organizer will aid students' comprehension as they read an article about conflicting ideas of land ownership between European settlers in America and American Indians.
Format: chart/lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
North Carolina maps
A collection of lesson plans for grades K-12 centered on historic maps of North Carolina
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Indian Museum of the Carolinas
This Native American museum features the Indians of the past, present day Indian groups and Indians of North America.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
The search for El Dorado
In Sir Walter Raleigh and South America, page 4
The legend of El Dorado predates the arrival of Spaniards in South America. The Chibcha people of present-day Colombia apparently performed an annual ritual where the leader was coated in fine gold dust, which he then washed off in a lake during a ceremony....
By William M. Wisser.
Reading guide: Native peoples of the Chesapeake region
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.8
This worksheet will help students understand the article "Native Peoples of the Chesapeake Region" and will encourage them to make connections between the Chesapeake Indians and the Indians of coastal North Carolina. Students will also consider multiple perspectives as they think critically about the interactions between Indians and newly-arrived Europeans in the 1600s.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Pottery from Town Creek
In Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use, page 4
Figure 4 shows some examples of pots and pottery fragments found at Town Creek along with artifacts made of stone and shell about 1200 CE. This photograph was made of one of the displays in the Museum at the Town Creek State Historic Site in Montgomery County....
By Dirk Frankenberg.
The search for El Dorado
The legend of El Dorado predates the arrival of Spaniards in South America. The Chibcha people of present-day Colombia apparently performed an annual ritual where the leader was coated in fine gold dust, which he then washed off in a lake during a solemn ceremony....
By William M. Wisser.
Oconaluftee Indian Village
A model of a Cherokee Indian Village from over 250 years ago with guides in native costume to answer questions and explain their heritage.
Format: article/field trip opportunity