K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Native Americans in North Carolina
In North Carolina maps, page 2.6
In this lesson, students create a PowerPoint presentation giving the history and impact of one of the six major Native American tribes of North Carolina. They will show understanding of population movement, different perspectives, and the roles the Native Americans played in the development of the state.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
Inca empire map
Inca empire map
This map shows the land controlled by the Inca empire during the 15th and 16th centuries.
Format: image/map
Woman pounding corn
Woman pounding corn
Black and white photograph of an American Indian woman pounding corn with a large mortar and pestle.
Format: image/photograph
Common artifacts: Flakes
Common artifacts: Flakes
Photograph of flakes found at the Occaneechi Town archaeological dig. Flakes are by-products of making chipped-stone tools. They usually are small, made of rhyolite or some other type of rock with conchoidal (glass-like) fracture properties, and have recognizable...
Format: image/photograph
Burial
Burial
Photograph of a burial, a common archaeological feature at Occaneechi Town. Burials are pits, usually oval or rectangular in shape and often quite deep, that were dug as individual graves. They contain the skeletal remains and accompanying funerary objects...
Format: image/photograph
Wow! A powwow!
Powwows have long been a tradition in the Native American culture. Even today, powwows are held across the United States and Canada. This lesson plan allows students the opportunity to research powwows, and in the process see that modern day Native Americans have a diverse culture.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 Social Studies)
By Betsy Bryan.
The Walking Classroom
Lesson plans and podcasts aligned to the fifth grade curriculum.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Indian Cabinetmakers in Piedmont North Carolina
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 4.5
Thomas Day, a well-known African American cabinetmaker in North Carolina, worked and socialized with members of the American Indian community, who often faced the same types of racial discrimination as free blacks. Historical evidence suggests that Uriah and Nathan Jeffreys, cabinetmakers of American Indian origins, were Day’s close friends and may have worked with him at one time.
Format: article
By Patricia Phillips Marshall.
Storage pit
Storage pit
Photograph of a storage pit, a common archaeological feature found at Occaneechi Town. Storage pits are large, deep, cylindrical holes that were dug near or inside houses for below-ground storage of food and other belongings. Once they were no longer needed,...
Format: image/photograph
Map: Native peoples in the Chesapeake region, circa 1610
Map: Native peoples in the Chesapeake region, circa 1610
Map showing the locations of American Indian groups in the Chesapeake Bay region, circa 1610.
Format: image/map
Map: Native peoples in the Chesapeake region, circa 2006
Map: Native peoples in the Chesapeake region, circa 2006
Map showing the locations of American Indian groups in the Chesapeake Bay region, circa 2006.
Format: image/map
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Lumbees face the Klan
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.8
In January 1958, the Ku Klux Klan burned crosses on the front lawns of two Indian families in Robeson County, North Carolina. In response, as many as a thousand Lumbees violently broke up a Klan meeting, and the Klan never again met publicly in Robeson County.
Format: article
Eastern Siouan culture area of North America
Eastern Siouan culture area of North America
Distribution of Siouan-speaking peoples in eastern North America (based on James Mooney's The Siouan Tribes of the East, 1894).
Format: image/map
The Blowing Rock in Blowing Rock, North Carolina
The Blowing Rock in Blowing Rock, North Carolina
This is the Blowing Rock in Blowing Rock, North Carolina. It is named after a Native American story in which two lovers from opposing tribes, the Catawba and the Cherokee, are walking near the rock. When a red sky signals that the brave must return to duty,...
Format: image/photograph
The Topsail Island Museum, Missiles and More
Displays showing the history of the Navy test missile site of the 1940s, artifacts of Native Americans found on the island, and exhibits of colonial era pirates can be found at the Topsail Island Museum.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Wall-trench structure
Wall-trench structure
Excavators at the Occaneechi Town archaeological dig preparing to map a wall-trench structure and associated pit at Occaneechi Town. A wall-trench structure is a structure showing where the posts supporting the wall and roof were placed.
Format: image/photograph
Common artifacts: Potsherds
Common artifacts: Potsherds
Photograph of potsherds found at Occaneechi Town. Potsherds are fragments of fired-clay cooking and storage pots that were made and used by the Occaneechi. Some potsherds predate Occaneechi Town, while others (usually glazed) date after the mid-1700s when...
Format: image/photograph
Understanding the Columbian Exchange
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 5.1
This lesson will help students think about the effects of the Columbian Exchange, particularly the exchange of disease as it affected the psychology of the Europeans and Native populations in the early settlement of the Americas.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7–8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Stroud cloth
Stroud cloth
At a replica of an eighteenth-century trade camp, a red stroud cloth lies in the grass. Stroud cloth was a cheap woolen cloth made in the town of Stroud in Glouchestershire County, England. The cloth was dyed red, blue, green, or black, and had a white edge...
Format: image/photograph