K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

charter school
A public school of choice, usually created by parents or educators seeking an alternative to traditional public schools. Developers create a contract, or charter, with a sponsoring agency (either state or local school board). In exchange for autonomy from many state and district requirements, charter schools are expected to offer financial responsibility, academic accountability for student performance, as well as innovative and challenging educational practices.
North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.

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A proprietary colony: Exploring the Charter of Carolina
In this lesson for grade 8, students will examine the 1663 Charter of Carolina and complete a graphic organizer exploring the elements of the Charter. Students will then write a letter to the King of England from the perspective of one of the Lords Proprietors.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Original boundaries of Carolina (1663/1665)
Original boundaries of Carolina (1663/1665)
This map shows the original borders of the province of Carolina as defined by the 1663 Charter of Carolina (dark green) and the subsequent charter of 1665 (light green). Under the charter of 1663, the borders of Carolina are defined as all the land from 31°...
Format: image/map
Haliwa-Saponi Cultural Exchange Day
Take part in the Haliwa-Saponi Cultural Exchange Day and learn about the Haliwa-Saponi culture while taking workshops in making traditional pottery, baskets, beadwork and soap.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Haliwa-Saponi Annual Powwow
Experience a North Carolina American Indian powwow with traditional food, dance, crafts, and much more.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Staging history: Charter School Teacher of the Year John Hall brings lessons to life
This article shares some of the instructional strategies of John Hall, 2009-10 AT&T Charter School’s Teacher of the Year. Mr. Hall brings social studies lessons to life by incorporating drama and art.
Format: article/best practice
By Dan Lewandowski.
The Wilmington and Weldon Railroad
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 5.4
When it was built in 1840, the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad was the longest in the world. During the Civil War it became known as the "lifeline of the Confederacy" for its role in moving goods from the port of Wilmington to Lee's army in Virginia.
Format: article
A Pledge to Violate the Stamp Act
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 2.5
In 1766, during the colonial protests of the Stamp Act, some residents of eastern North Carolina, including many colonial leaders, signed this pledge to refuse to pay the tax. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Culpeper's Rebellion
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.11
In the 1670s, the British government insisted that exports from Carolina be taxed, but a group of settlers in the Albemarle region rebelled against what they saw as an unreasonable burden. The Lords Proprietors eventually regained control of the colony, but in the meantime, colonists set a precedent for governing themselves.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
About LEARN NC
LEARN NC, a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education, provides lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina.
Format: article/help
Seven members of the first officially recognized Corn Club in North Carolina were present 45 years later at the dedication of an historical marker commemorating their pioneering work.
Seven members of the first officially recognized Corn Club in North Carolina were present 45 years later at the dedication of an historical marker commemorating their pioneering work.
Seven members of the first officially recognized Corn Club in North Carolina were present 45 years later at the dedication of an historical marker commemorating their pioneering work. Charter club members taking part in the ceremonies were (left to right)...
Format: image/photograph
The Mount Airy Museum of Regional History
This regional museum strives to collect, preserve, and interpret the natural, historic and artistic heritage of this "back country region at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains."
Format: article/field trip opportunity
A Declaration and Proposals of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.6
Initial plans by the Lords Proprietors for settling and governing the province of Carolina. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: declaration/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Electric streetcars
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 1.2
North Carolina's first electric streetcar systems were built between 1889 and 1902. The new form of transportation changed the layout of cities.
Format: article
"Land and Work in Carolina" teaching strategies
A variety of suggested activities for use with an article that explains the key elements of feudalism, with a focus on how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Lighting the maritime path: The geography of North Carolina's lighthouses
In this lesson students will examine images of North Carolina lighthouses from the Built Heritage Collection at North Carolina State University and explore various websites to determine the relative location of eight North Carolina lighthouses and develop an understanding of maritime activities and coastal living.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 Social Studies)
By Sonna Jamerson.
Rumors of the Lost Colony in Jamestown
William Strachey, first secretary of the Jamestown colony, wrote a history of that colony in 1612. In it, he mentioned several rumors about the fate of the colonists who had disappeared from Roanoke twenty years before.
Format: article
A timeline of North Carolina colleges (1766–1861)
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.12
Brief information about the more than thirty private colleges established in North Carolina before the Civil War.
Format: timeline
Whigs and Democrats
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.1
After the War of 1812, the two-party system of Federalists and Democratic-Republicans collapsed, and an era of one-party rule was known as the Era of Good Feelings. But new conflicts arose over the presidency of Andrew Jackson, the Second Bank of the United States, and tariffs, and two new parties, the Whigs and the Democrats, emerged. In North Carolina, the Whigs gained power in the 1830s and began a period of reform.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Understanding North Carolina's Moravian settlers
In this lesson plan, students read a diary written by a young Moravian man traveling from Pennsylvania to a Moravian settlement in North Carolina in 1733. Students complete a graphic organizer with details of the journey and follow the route on a map.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Fort Raleigh and the Lost Colony
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 4.3
England's first two settlements in the New World differed in character and purpose: The first short-lived colony, inhabited entirely by men, was set up as a stake in the newly discovered Americas and a base of privateering against French and Spanish shipping. The second was intended as a permanent colony and was settled by men, women and children. Their disappearance is a mystery that remains unsolved nearly 400 years later.
Format: article