K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.

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Colonial and state records of North Carolina
Lessons developed using the Colonial State Records of North Carolina collection from Documenting the American South
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Introduction to colonial times
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 1
In this lesson, students are introduced to different types of sources while also learning about the colonial time period.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 Social Studies)
By Lara Willox.
The land of milk and honey: Reasons for migration
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 2
In this lesson, students brainstorm reasons people leave their homes and move somewhere else. After discussing modern day reasons for migration, students will explore the motives of early settlers to immigrate to colonial North Carolina. Motives will be explored using a primary source, specifically letters from potential settlers asking for permission to come to the "land of milk and honey."
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 Social Studies)
By Lara Willox.
Moravians in North Carolina
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 5
In this lesson students will explore groups that moved to North Carolina from other colonies. Time will be spent discussing the influence the Moravians had on colonial North Carolina. Students will also research the buildings that were a part of an early Moravian town.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 Social Studies)
By Lara Willox.
Native Americans: Original natives of colonial North Carolina
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 7
In this lesson, students will explore different groups of Native Americans that inhabited the lands of North Carolina prior to the arrival of the colonists. Students will also examine how colonists interacted with the Native Americans after the colonists arrived in North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 Social Studies)
By Lara Willox.
Politics and economics of land settlement in colonial North Carolina
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 10
In this lesson, students will use a primary source document to examine the political nature of land settlement in North Carolina. The influence of the economy on the land settlement will also be highlighted. Students will also learn about colonial industry in North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
North Carolina: A pirate's safe haven
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 6
In this lesson, students will examine written records regarding the presence of pirates off the coast of the North Carolina colony. Using primary source documents, the students will discover that North Carolina did not discourage pirates from living along the coast. The students will also explore economic and social reasons for harboring pirates.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 Social Studies)
By Lara Willox.
The growth of slavery in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 2.5
Slavery came to North Carolina with the first European settlement, though it grew slowly at first. The institution developed in a unique way in North Carolina, and by the early national period it was fully integrated into the state's society and economy.
Format: article
The land of milk and honey: Relocated or not
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 4
In this lesson, students read primary sources to learn about the establishment of the city of New Bern, North Carolina. The students will also use maps to draw conclusions about what was read.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 English Language Arts)
By Lara Willox.
Conflicts in North Carolina colonial history: Culpeper's Rebellion
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 9
In this lesson, students will work independently to examine primary source documents and secondary sources to answer questions about Culpeper's Rebellion. This lesson is best taught after the lesson Conflicts in North Carolina Colonial History: Tuscarora War.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Lara Willox.
Webquest: The journeys and journals of John Lederer
In North Carolina maps, page 3.4
In this lesson, students complete a webquest in which they study maps in relation to primary source texts to glean insights into the discovery of Western North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
Governing the Piedmont
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.7
As settlers spread across the North Carolina Piedmont in the eighteenth century, the provincial government didn't keep up with them. Westerners weren't fairly represented in the provincial Assembly, and the so-called "Granville District," owned by the one remaining Lord Proprietor, was badly mismanaged.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Conflicts in North Carolina colonial history: Tuscarora War
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 8
In this lesson, the class will work together to examine primary source documents and secondary sources to answer questions about the Tuscarora War.
Format: lesson plan
By Lara Willox.
Residents of the backcountry proclaim their loyalty
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 2.10
Petition from residents of Rowan and Surry counties, North Carolina, to Governor Josiah Martin, 1775, proclaiming their opposition to Revolutionary activity and their loyalty to the king. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
The land of milk and honey: Propaganda and the colonies
In Colonial and state records of North Carolina, page 3
In this lesson, students use primary sources to examine the use of propaganda and how it influenced people's decisions to immigrate to the colonies.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Lara Willox.
An orphan's apprenticeship
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.9
An indenture from Bertie County, North Carolina, 1759, apprenticing an orphan boy to a shipwright. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Native Americans in North Carolina
In North Carolina maps, page 2.6
In this lesson, students create a PowerPoint presentation giving the history and impact of one of the six major Native American tribes of North Carolina. They will show understanding of population movement, different perspectives, and the roles the Native Americans played in the development of the state.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
Learning in colonial Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.8
During the late 1600s and early 1700s, education in Carolina was largely informal. Most children learned by watching and imitating parents and older community members. The sons of the wealthy were sent away to schools in other colonies or in England. The first efforts to provide formal education in Carolina were made by religious groups — the Quakers, the Baptists, and the Presbyterians.
Format: article
By Betty Dishong Renfer.
Johnston County Heritage Center
Learn about the history of Johnston County at this Heritage Center which houses interpretive exhibits and primary source documents.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
The Regulators organize
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.3
Subscription to an organization of Regulators, January 1768. The subscribers agreed to resist paying taxes and fees they considred unlawful and to petition their representatives to change laws they considered unfair. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: declaration/primary source