K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Suffrage: The changing role of women
In this lesson, students use oral history excerpts and photographs to learn about the women's suffrage movement in the United States from a variety of perspectives.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Goodbye, Bill Of Rights!
Students will enact a scene demonstrating life without one of the first ten amendments. Students will be put into groups of three or four and assigned a specific amendment to research.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 Social Studies)
By Greg Simmons.
Gertrude Weil
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.4
Biography of Gertrude Weil (1879–1971) of Goldsboro, who led the fight for women's suffrage in North Carolina.
Format: biography
By Jill Molloy and L. Maren Wood.
The Voting Rights Act of 1965
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.12
Five months after the Selma-to-Montgmery March, the Congress passed and President Johnson signed into law the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This law gave the federal government the power to enforce the Fifteenth Amendment, which guaranteed equal voting rights regardless of race.
Format: book
Timeline of Women's Suffrage
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.1
A timeline of the major events in the long campaign for women's voting rights, from the nation's independence in 1776 to North Carolina's ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1971.
Format: timeline
By Jill Molloy.
The Equal Rights Amendment
In Postwar North Carolina, page 8.6
Oral history interview with activist Martha McKay about the ERA's defeat in North Carolina. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
African Americans get the vote in eastern North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.9
After the Civil War, African American communities in eastern North Carolina, having already tasted freedom during the war, were ready to fight for political rights.
Format: article
Amending the U.S. Constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.8
Text of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution, passed after the Civil War to abolish slavery and to guarantee the civil rights of African Americans.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
The birth of "Jim Crow"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.1
During the years that followed Reconstruction, and especially after 1890, state governments in the South adopted segregationist laws mandating separation of the races in nearly every aspect of everyday life. This system was known informally as "Jim Crow."
Format: book
North Carolina and the women's suffrage amendment
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.10
Article tells the story of the political battle in North Carolina over ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.
Format: article
The Civil Rights Act of 1964
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.9
The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibited acts of private discrimination in public places and gave the federal government far broader authority than it had ever previously taken.
Format: article
Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas
In Brown versus Board of Education: Rhetoric and realities, page 2.5
In Postwar North Carolina, page 4.2
The text of the Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, that the segregation of public schools was in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.
Format: court decision
The women's movement
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.6
A brief history of the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s, including equal opportunity, reproductive issues, and the Equal Rights Amendment.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
Reform movements across the United States
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.2
In the 1830s and 1840s, a wave of social and political reform swept the United States. Various groups of reformers, often inspired by religion, worked to expand the vote, promote equal rights for women, improve labor conditions, build free public schools, limit alcohol use, and improve treatment of criminals and the insane.
Format: article
Women, then and now
In this lesson, students will analyze images and a home demonstration pamphlet, a Cooperative Extension Work document from the Green 'N' Growing collection at Special Collections Research Center at North Carolina State University Libraries. The primary sources will help students assess the roles, opportunities, and achievements of women beginning in 1950.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Social Studies)
By Lisa Stamey.
Reconstruction in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.3
Brief history of events in North Carolina following the Civil War, 1866–1876.
Format: article
Origins of the Civil Rights Movement
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.1
An overview of the Civil Rights Movement from the end of World War II through the Civil Rights Act of 1957, including school desegregation and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.
Format: article
Women's “libbers”
In this oral history excerpt, Rosamonde Boyd expresses her views on the women's liberation movement and contrasts it with the work she did to advance women's causes. In particular, she and the interviewer focus on feminist views of marriage.
Format: audio
North Carolina demands a declaration of rights
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.6
North Carolina initially rejected the United States Constitution, insisting that it be amended and that a Declaration of Rights be added. The text of the proposed declaration and amendments is provided here with historical commentary noting which provisions found their way into the Bill of Rights.
Format: document/primary source