K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.

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Reading guide: A Brief Description of the Province of Carolina
Reading guide designed to aid students' comprehension of a primary source document — a 17th-century pamphlet produced in London describing the economic opportunity and religious freedom available to settlers in Carolina.
Format: worksheet/lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
A little kingdom in Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.3
The original vision for Carolina was a feudal province in which eight "Lords Proprietors" would have nearly royal power, but with an elected assembly and guarantees of religious freedom.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
"Land and Work in Carolina" teaching strategies
A variety of suggested activities for use with an article that explains the key elements of feudalism, with a focus on how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Anticipation guide: "A Little Kingdom in Carolina"
A learner's guide to the article "A Little Kingdom in Carolina," this activity will support student comprehension.
Format: worksheet/learner's guide
By Pauline S. Johnson.
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
Land and work in Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.10
This article explains the key elements of feudalism, including its hierarchy of personal relationships and system of landholding, and how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina (1669)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.9
The lengthy and complicated plan devised by the Lords Proprietors for the government of Carolina would have established a feudal system of elaborate courts, manors, and serfs. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The Lords Proprietors
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.5
Brief biographies of the eight men named Lords Proprietors of the province of Carolina by Charles II in 1663.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Culpeper's Rebellion
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.11
In the 1670s, the British government insisted that exports from Carolina be taxed, but a group of settlers in the Albemarle region rebelled against what they saw as an unreasonable burden. The Lords Proprietors eventually regained control of the colony, but in the meantime, colonists set a precedent for governing themselves.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
A forced migration
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.3
The first Africans, brought to America through forced migration, came as indentured servants to Jamestown, Virginia, in 1619. Africans brought to the colonies in later years were bought and sold as slaves. At the time of the American Revolution, most of the enslaved people in North Carolina lived in the eastern part of the colony and the majority lived on large plantations, where their work was critical to the state’s cash crops and economy.
Format: article
By Jennifer Farley.
An Act to Encourage the Settlement of this Country (1707)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 2.2
Passed by the provincial Assembly of Carolina in 1707, this legislation provides incentives for settlers and explains the justification for doing so. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
A Brief Description of the Province of Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.8
A pamphlet produced in 1660s London at the request of the Lords Proprietors described the economic opportunity and religious freedom available to settlers in Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
A Declaration and Proposals of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.6
Initial plans by the Lords Proprietors for settling and governing the province of Carolina. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: declaration/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The women's movement
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.6
A brief history of the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s, including equal opportunity, reproductive issues, and the Equal Rights Amendment.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
The North Carolina Constitution and Declaration of Rights
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.14
Full text of the 1776 state constitution of North Carolina, with historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
The Charter of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.4
In the Charter of Carolina, King Charles II of England granted the eight men known as the Lords Proprietors rights to the land that became North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: charter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.