K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Great Wagon Road marker
Great Wagon Road marker
A historical marker along the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road -- also referred to simply as the "Great Wagon Road." The plaque reads: 1753 Great Philadelphia Wagon Road The most heavily traveled in Colonial America passed near here, linking areas...
Format: image/photograph
Mapping the Great Wagon Road
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.2
The Great Wagon Road took eighteenth-century colonists from Philadelphia west into the Appalachian mountains and south into the North Carolina Piedmont. This article describes the route and its history and offers two detailed maps, one from 1751 and one from the present, for comparison.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
November 6 - November 9, 1753
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 8
Nov. 6. We took up our journey; Br. Hermanus remained behind to thrash oats for Mr. Johnsen. We had to drive through many muddy places and the wagon was often in danger of sticking fast. We had much work cutting out the road, which was so narrow that...
Format: diary/primary source
Fry-Jefferson map of Virginia, 1751, showing the Great Wagon Road
Fry-Jefferson map of Virginia, 1751, showing the Great Wagon Road
"A map of the most inhabited part of Virginia containing the whole province of Maryland with part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina." Drawn by Joshua Fry & Peter Jefferson in 1751, published by Thos. Jefferys, London, 1755. Fry and Jefferson...
Format: image/map
Discussion questions: Expanding to the west
This set of discussion questions was designed to help students understand an article about the settlement of the Piedmont region of North Carolina between 1730 and 1775.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Integrating maps
In Map skills and higher-order thinking, page 6
Textbooks frequently use maps as learning aids, but research has found that the way maps are most often used does not support students' learning. It turns out that both the order and the context in which materials are presented are crucial....
Format: article/best practice
By David Walbert.
October 13 - October 17, 1753
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 3
Oct. 13. The Susquehanna River at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, referred to in the diary as "Harrison's Ferry." After eating some broth we set out on our journey. The Brn. Grube and Lösch...
Format: diary/primary source
October 23 - October 27, 1753
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 5
Oct. 23. We started at daybreak. We bought a bottle of milk to use at our noon lunch, but the bottle broke and we lost it all. Two miles from camp we bought some meat; had six miles to North River, where we stopped for...
Format: diary/primary source
October 28 - November 1, 1753
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 6
Oct. 28. This historical marker stands along the route of the Great Wagon Road. We rose early to continue our journey. One of our horses was sick. After a mile and a half we bought...
Format: diary/primary source
October 7 - October 12, 1753
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 2
[Oct. 7 - Oct. 8, 1753] At the evening service ("Singstunde") we were prepared for our journey, received the blessing from our dear Brother, and finally partook together of the "Cup of blessing." The next morning, that is
Format: diary/primary source
Expanding to the west: Settlement of the Piedmont region, 1730 to 1775
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.1
The population of North Carolina's Piedmont region more than doubled in the decade from 1765 to 1775. Most of the settlers who arrived during that time were European Americans traveling from the North via the Great Indian Trading Path and the Great Wagon Road.
Format: article
By Christopher E. Hendricks and J. Edwin Hendricks.
Understanding North Carolina's Moravian settlers
In this lesson plan, students read a diary written by a young Moravian man traveling from Pennsylvania to a Moravian settlement in North Carolina in 1733. Students complete a graphic organizer with details of the journey and follow the route on a map.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Diary of a journey of Moravians
First-hand account of the journey of twelve Moravian brothers from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania to Bethabara, North Carolina in 1753.
Format: diary (multiple pages)
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
November 10 - November 13, 1753
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 9
Nov. 10. It began to clear a little. The river, however, was still higher, and we spent most of the day drying our blankets, mending, and darning our stockings. We also bought some bushels of corn and some meat from our neighbors, who were glad that...
Format: diary/primary source
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
Diary of a journey of Moravians
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.3
In 1733, a group of Moravians -- a Protestant Christian denomination originating in fourteenth-century Bohemia -- moved from Europe to North America seeking freedom from religious persecution. In 1753, a group of twelve single brothers left Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, for a new settlement in North Carolina. These excerpts from their diary show the difficulties they faced on their journey. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
A Sampson County farm family
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.6
WPA life history interview with a couple in Sampson County, North Carolina, about their experiences during the Great Depression. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The burning of Elizabeth City
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.4
Excerpt from Richard Creecy's memoir describing the fall of Elizabeth City to Union troops in February 1862 and its partial burning by residents. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
The lasting impact of the Great Depression
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.12
Oral history interview with a Madison County, North Carolina, man about how the Great Depression affected his family and community long after the economic downturn ended. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.