K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

ATTENTION USERS

LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

Map of Indian villages
Map of Indian villages
Map of historic Indian villages in North Carolina.
Format: image/map
Coastal Plain cultures graphic organizer
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.5
As students read the article "Peoples of the Coastal Plain," this graphic organizer will help them develop an understanding of the cultures that existed in North Carolina's Coastal Plain hundreds of years ago.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Reading guide: Native peoples of the Chesapeake region
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.8
This worksheet will help students understand the article "Native Peoples of the Chesapeake Region" and will encourage them to make connections between the Chesapeake Indians and the Indians of coastal North Carolina. Students will also consider multiple perspectives as they think critically about the interactions between Indians and newly-arrived Europeans in the 1600s.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Mountain cultures graphic organizer
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.4
As students read the article "Peoples of the Mountains," this graphic organizer will help them develop an understanding of the cultures that existed in North Carolina's mountains hundreds of years ago.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
The search for El Dorado
The legend of El Dorado predates the arrival of Spaniards in South America. The Chibcha people of present-day Colombia apparently performed an annual ritual where the leader was coated in fine gold dust, which he then washed off in a lake during a solemn ceremony....
By William M. Wisser.
The search for El Dorado
In Sir Walter Raleigh and South America, page 4
The legend of El Dorado predates the arrival of Spaniards in South America. The Chibcha people of present-day Colombia apparently performed an annual ritual where the leader was coated in fine gold dust, which he then washed off in a lake during a ceremony....
By William M. Wisser.
Native American Village of Pomeiooc
Native American Village of Pomeiooc
Hand-colored version of Theodor de Bry's engraving of the American Indian town of Pomeiooc. De Bry's engraving, "The Towne of Pomeiooc," was originally published as an illustration in Thomas Hariot's 1588 book A Briefe and True Report of the New Found...
Format: image/illustration
Native American Village of Secoton
Native American Village of Secoton
Hand-colored version of Theodor de Bry's engraving depicting the American Indian town of Secota. De Bry's engraving, "The Tovvne of Secota," was originally published as an illustration in Thomas Hariot's 1588 book A Briefe and True Report of the New...
Format: image/illustration
Quick study: Mississippian Period
A “cheat sheet” covering basic information about the Mississippian Period and its key characteristics.
About the Archaeology Primer
In Excavating Occaneechi Town: An archaeology primer, page 1
The Occaneechi Indians were once prominent in the Virginia and Carolina Piedmont. As their numbers were reduced by clashes with European colonists, they retreated to a village on the Eno River. Their numbers further dwindled due to disease and warfare, and by 1730 the Occaneechi were all but gone. In 1983, archaeologists discovered a village site near Hillsborough, North Carolina. Through a series of digs, they confirmed that they had found Occaneechi Town.
Format: article
Language families
In Intrigue of the Past, page 4.7
Students will identify and locate the three language families of contact period North Carolina and calculate the physical area covered by each language family.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 7–8 Mathematics and Social Studies)
North Carolina place names
In Intrigue of the Past, page 4.8
This lesson contrasts and compares the names that Native Americans living in North Carolina gave to their villages and places with the names that European and other settlers gave to theirs.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 Social Studies)
Cherokee women
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.8
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.2
Before the arrival of Europeans in North America, women enjoyed a major role in the family life, economy, and government of the Cherokee Indians. Cherokee society was organized according to a matrilineal kinship system, and women were the heads of households. Women also did most of the farming and had a voice in government.
Format: article/primary source
By Theda Perdue.
The Tuscarora War
In Colonial North Carolina, page 3.2
The encroachment of British colonists on Tuscarora land in North Carolina resulted in numerous conflicts. Control over the most desirable land caused disputes, British settlers engaged in unfair trade practices and violated treaties, and the Tuscarora raided British livestock. In 1711, these and other sources of conflict erupted into bloody warfare. With the assistance of soldiers and rival tribes from South Carolina, the Tuscarora were defeated in 1712. Following the war, the Tuscarora emigrated to New York and joined the Iroquois of the Long House.
Format: article
"The difference is about our land": Cherokees and Catawbas
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 4.1
During the American Revolution, American Indians living in North Carolina had to choose whether to support England or the colonists. While different groups of Indians made different decisions, most made their choices based on how they thought they could best protect their lands.
Format: article
By Jim L. Sumner.
An Aged Man in His Winter Garment
An Aged Man in His Winter Garment
"An Ageed Manne in His Winter Garment." Theodor de Bry's engraving of an American Indian man, published in Thomas Hariot's 1588 book A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia. In the foreground, the man is standing with his right...
Format: image/illustration
Who owns the land?
In Colonial North Carolina, page 3.3
Europeans and American Indians had very different ideas about what it meant to "own" land, and these differences led to many of the conflicts between the two cultures in America.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Peoples of the Piedmont
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.4
In the years between 1000 and 1200 CE, Native life in the north and central Piedmont hadn’t changed much from prior Woodland times. People still lived in small hamlets whose houses strung out along river and stream banks. At times, the hamlets sat empty when people left to hunt and gather wild foods. But times were about to change. Around 900 CE, corn agriculture began. As a result, population began to grow, people began gathering in larger villages, and conflicts erupted.
Format: article
The Rutherford Expedition
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 4.3
The Cherokee, hoping to protect their lands from white settlement, sided with Britain in the American Revolution. In 1776, responding to Cherokee attacks, General Griffith Rutherford led an expedition against the Cherokee, taking slaves, burning villages, and destroying crops and food stores.
Format: article
Peoples of the Coastal Plain
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.6
When Europeans arrived in the late 1500s, North Carolina’s northern Coastal Plain was home to two different cultures. Speakers of Algonkian languages lived closest to the Atlantic edge, in the Outer Coastal Plain or Tidewater. Iroquoian speakers lived more inland, on the Inner Coastal Plain. Based on the distinctive items each group left, archaeologists call the Algonkian speakers Colington and the Iroquoian speakers Cashie.
Format: article