K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

James and the Giant Pencil: Lessons in classroom management
In The First Year, page 2.7
Don't back your students into a corner, and don't make discipline the focus of your class.
Format: article
By Kristi Johnson Smith.Commentary and sidebar notes by Lindy Norman.
Communicating with parents at the beginning of the year
In The First Year, page 1.3
Start communicating with parents at the beginning of the year, to establish a relationship before you have anything negative to say.
Format: article/best practice
By Kristi Johnson Smith.Commentary and sidebar notes by Lindy Norman.
Reynolda House Museum of American Art
Students will see the estate of Katharine Smith and Richard Joshua Reynolds and an extensive art collection when they visit the Reynolda House.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
North Carolina's Governors, 1789–1836
Timeline of governors of North Carolina in the early national period, with political party affiliation.
Format: timeline
You (yes, you!) are making a difference: The power of a single phrase
In The First Year, page 2.5
A teacher's goal is to reach every student, but while you are working on big issues and ideals, take advantage of the small moments that your position affords you.
Format: article
By Kristi Johnson Smith.Commentary and sidebar notes by Lindy Norman.
The North Carolina Fund
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.2
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.13
During the 1960s, the North Carolina Fund was created to wage an "all-out assault on poverty" in the state.
Format: article
The Buncombe Turnpike
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 7.6
The Buncombe Turnpike began in the early nineteenth century as the Drover's Road through western North Carolina, used to drive livestock to market. The Turnpike brought trade and increased prosperity to the region and especially to Asheville. After the Civil War, economic recession and the rise of railroads led to its decline.
Format: article
Diary of a farm wife
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.3
April 1854 Page from Penelope Alderman diary. Mond. 3. Wove some. Mr. A. ploughing and...
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Johnston surrenders
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.11
Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston surrendered his army to Union General William T. Sherman at Bennett Place in present-day Durham, North Carolina on April 26, 1865, effectively ending the Civil War.
Format: article
Small-town businesses, 1903
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.10
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 9.5
Excerpts from The North Carolina Year Book and Business Directory, 1903, for the towns of Jefferson and Washington. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Idol’s Dam and Power Plant
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 1.3
Though electricity first arrived in Winston and Salem in 1887, it was the development of Idol's Dam and Power Plant a decade later that truly moved the towns forward in terms of productivity and industrial development.
Format: article
The founding of Virginia
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.1
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.3
England planted its first successful North American colony at Jamestown in 1607, but settlers fought Indians and disease, and the colony grew slowly. By the end of the seventeenth century, Virginia had established tobacco as its main crop, a representative government, and slavery as a dominant system of labor.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
The Freedom Riders
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.5
The Supreme Court ruled in 1960 that all buses and facilities associated with interstate travel must be desegregated. But blacks who used whites-only waiting rooms and refused to give up their seats to whites faced mob violence. Their refusal either to stop or to fight back showed Americans -- many for the first time -- the hard reality of racial oppression.
Format: book
Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 1.4
Article about Herbert Hoover's unsuccessful attempts as President to stop the country's slide into economic catastrophe.
Format: article
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
October 23 - October 27, 1753
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 5
Oct. 23. We started at daybreak. We bought a bottle of milk to use at our noon lunch, but the bottle broke and we lost it all. Two miles from camp we bought some meat; had six miles to North River, where we stopped for...
Format: diary/primary source
A timeline of North Carolina colleges and universities, 1865–1900
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.1
Timeline of colleges and universities founded in North Carolina between the end of the Civil War and the turn of the twentieth century.
Format: timeline
By Jill Molloy.
Special celebrations
Although the first Christmas parties for estate workers were held in the Banquet hall of Biltmore house, they later moved to the Dairy, most likely because of the ever-expanding numbers of employees required for the growing operations. Sarah Lanning surmised...
Format: article
By Sue Clark McKendree.
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Diary of a planter
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.3
Excerpt from the diary of Henry W. Harrington, Jr., a plantation owner in Richmond County, North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.