K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Leaders of the Knights of Labor
Leaders of the Knights of Labor
Format: image/poster
Opposition to the Knights of Labor
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.11
Editorial in a Durham newspaper, 1887, expressing concern about the Knights of Labor. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The Bonsack machine and labor unrest
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.7
When the Duke tobacco company adopted the Bonsack machine for rolling cigarettes, workers who had rolled cigarettes by hand were thrown out of work, and their replacements made less money.
Format: article
The Knights of Labor
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.10
Excerpt from the 1878 Platform of the Knights of Labor, an early labor union. Includes historical commentary.
Format: declaration/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The rise of labor unions
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.9
Little of the wealth that industry produced went to workers, and improvements in technology further reduced wages without making work any easier or less dangerous. In the late ninenteenth century, workers began to organize to demand higher wages and better working conditions.
Format: article
Ending child labor in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.1
The movement to ban child labor began in the early 1900s and slowly turned the tide of public opinion. As mill work changed in the 1920s, mills employed fewer children. North Carolina finally regulated child labor in 1933.
Format: article
Land and work in Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.10
This article explains the key elements of feudalism, including its hierarchy of personal relationships and system of landholding, and how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Camp Bragg
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.7
This 1919 description of Fort Bragg and the process of building it during World War I was published as part of a larger book promoting Fayetteville and the surrounding area. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
A bilious fever
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.9
Excerpt from an 1850 novel in which the author describes the illness he succumbed to on a trip to Nag's Head. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.