K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.
service learning
Intentional combination of community service objectives and learning opportunities that benefits both the recipient and provider of the service. Student service learning projects should be structured to link learning tasks to self-reflection so that they enrich learning, strengthen communities, and teach civic responsibility.
in-service training
Workshops and lectures designed to keep practicing teachers informed about current trends and practices in their field.

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Grooming
This Depression-era pamphlet provided instruction for teenaged girls on health, beauty, and grooming, from tips on hairdos to recipes for homemade shampoo and deodorant. Important: This pamphlet is republished for historical purposes and should not be taken as advice.
Format: pamphlet (multiple pages)
Health and beauty in the 1930s
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.8
Pamphlet produced by the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service in 1939, explaining rules and guidelines for grooming for teenage girls. Includes reading questions.
Format: pamphlet
Winners in North Carolina's Feed a Fighter Program
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.8
This letter from the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service announced the winners in North Carolina's "Feed a Fighter" program -- the 4-H members who grew the most food for the war effort. The winners were Sullivan Fisher and Edna Vann Lewis, both of Nash County. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
4-H and Home Demonstration during the Great Depression
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.8
4-H and Home Demonstration, dating from the early twentieth century, were established to instruct children and women in agricultural practice and home economics.
Format: article
By Amy Manor.
Farmville's choice
In this lesson, students will learn about rural life in North Carolina at the turn of the century. Home demonstration and 4H clubs implemented many programs to help people learn better farming techniques, ways of preserving food, and taking care of the home. Several North Carolina leaders went to great lengths to ensure the success of these programs. In part of this activity, students help the town of Farmville dedicate a monument to one of those people.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Feed a Fighter in Forty-Four
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.6
This pamphlet was sent by the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service to 4-H members and other interested youth in the spring of 1944 as part of the ongoing "Feed a Fighter" campaign to mobilize youth to aid the war effort during World War II. Includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Enlistment for Victory (1943)
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.5
This "Enlistment for Victory" letter was given to boys and girls as part of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service's "Mobilization for Victory" campaign during World War II. The first part introduces the program; the second is a list of projects that kids could take on. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
4-H and Home Demonstration Work during World War II
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.3
During the years of World War II, North Carolina women were led by Home Demonstration and extension agents in programs to increase food production and preservation. 4-H clubs also aided the war effort, primarily through the "Food for Victory" program and the "Feed a Fighter" campaign.
Format: article
By Amy Manor.
Grooming
Grooming
This black and white illustration is the cover of a pamphlet on grooming that was issued by the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service in 1939. Under the title, “Grooming,” sits a fashionable and svelte young woman who is posing with her...
Format: image/illustration
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
4-H mobilization for victory (1943)
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.4
In this letter to local extension agents, the North Carolina Director of Extension, J. O. Shaub, explained what 4-H clubs needed to do to mobilize youth to aid the war effort during World War II. Includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
4-H club contributions to the war effort
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.7
This page includes three reports sent by county agents of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service after the war ended. Each county agent outlined the contributions of 4-H club members in his or her county to the war effort. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
North Carolina State University
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.2
North Carolina State University was founded in 1887 as the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, a land-grant institution that would provide teaching, research and extension services to the people of the state. This article gives a brief history of the school from its founding to the present day.
Format: article
Canning for country and community
In this lesson plan, students will use primary source documents to evaluate the technological challenges of food preservation in the 30s and 40s, compare food preservation in the first half of the twentieth century with today, and consider the political role of food in the community.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Melissa Thibault.
Grooming in 1930s North Carolina
Using primary source materials, this lesson plan provides a glimpse into the lives of girls and women from the 1930s and will give students the opportunity to study what was considered attractive for the time, how the Depression affected grooming practices, and the universal concept of healthful living.
Format: article
By Pauline S. Johnson.
The Live at Home Program
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.7
The Live At Home program, established during the Great Depression, helped North Carolinians to grow food to support themselves and to sell surplus food at local farmers markets. This 1936 report includes historical background and commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Embryology: Hatching baby chicks
This lesson integrates science, math, communication skills, arts, and social studies through hands-on activities. Students are directly involved in hatching baby chicks.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1–2 and 4 Science)
By Ann White.
Evaluating woody biomass options for North Carolina's electricity future
In this high-school lesson, students learn about the pros and cons of co-firing woody biomass fuels with coal to produce electricity.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies)
By Dana Haine.