K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.
North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.

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Interstate highways from the ground up
This lesson gives students a first-hand opportunity to hear about the planning and effort it takes to build a highway by through an oral history of a North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) resident engineer.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
National highways in North Carolina
National highways in North Carolina
PDF versions are available from the U.S. Department of Transportation / Federal Highway Administration.
Format: image/map
Norlina Train Museum
Go back in time and learn about the history of the town of Norlina at this museum which houses only local railroad memorabilia.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
The North Carolina Railroad
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 5.2
The North Carolina Railroad, built in the 1850s, connected Charlotte, Greensboro, and Goldsboro.
Format: article
North Carolina's physical and cultural geography
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 1.3
In this lesson students will make assumptions about the influence of geography on various aspects of historical human and cultural geography.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
The Wilmington and Weldon Railroad
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 5.4
When it was built in 1840, the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad was the longest in the world. During the Civil War it became known as the "lifeline of the Confederacy" for its role in moving goods from the port of Wilmington to Lee's army in Virginia.
Format: article
The cabinet
In Election 2012, page 2.8
A guide to the North Carolina Governor's cabinet including the Council of State, department Secretaries and the Lieutenant Governor. Includes information about the 2012 candidates for all elected cabinet positions.
Format: bibliography
Change in the mountains
The resources on this page are designed to help educators teach about changes that have occurred in the mountain region of North Carolina over the last century. The lessons will provide an opportunity for students to learn about the effects technological innovation had on community development in mountain communities.
Format: lesson plan
"For us the war is ended"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.14
Order issued by the Union general in command of occupied North Carolina, April 1865, announcing the end of hostilities, promising fair treatment, and setting rules for citizens. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The evacuation
In Recent North Carolina, page 5.6
The evacuation of coastal areas before the approach of Hurricane Floyd in September 1999 created the largest traffic jams in history and led to the development of new, coordinated evacuation procedures.
Format: article
The Good Roads movement
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 1.11
The first document on this page is a letter written by the president of the North Carolina Good Roads Association, W. A. McGritt, to the state’s governor, Thomas Bickett. The second is from a pamphlet published by the association, encouraging citizens to support a tax for the construction of roads. Historical commentary provides a short history of the Good Roads movement.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Industrialization in North Carolina
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.7
Industrialization needed five things -- capital, labor, raw materials, markets, and transportation -- and in the 1870s, North Carolina had all of them. This article explains the process of industrialization in North Carolina, with maps of factory and railroad growth.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Interstate highways from the ground up
In Postwar North Carolina, page 2.3
NCDOT resident engineer Stan Hyatt lived in Madison County most of his life, and he loved hunting and exploring the mountain when he was younger. He helped design and build I-26, a project that meant the destruction of some of the environment where he grew up. He talks about the costs and benefits of highway construction in this interview.
Format: interview
By Kristin Post.
Key industries: Biotechnology
In Recent North Carolina, page 3.4
Biotechnology is a perfect example of a "new economy" industry, a sector that did not exist as we know it a century ago but is a major economic driver for many national and regional economies today. This article gives an overview of the biotechnology industry in North Carolina.
Format: article
Barrier islands
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.8
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students examine the difference between simple overwash barrier islands and complex barrier islands. They also learn more about the island-building process and the effect this process can have on daily life on barrier islands.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Background information for chapter two
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 2.1
This page contains background information for teachers implementing chapter two of the unit “Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina’s Outer Banks.”
Format: article
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Key industries: Furniture
In Recent North Carolina, page 3.5
The traditional North Carolina furniture industry has been experiencing drastic changes in the past decade. This article gives an overview of the industry's history and current state in North Carolina.
Format: article
Couriers and messengers: Real-world problem solving
In CareerStart lessons: Grade eight, page 3.4
In this lesson plan, students take on the role of couriers and use indirect measurement to plan a delivery.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7–8 Mathematics)
By Valerie Davis, Sonya Rexrode, and Monika Vasili.
The Roanoke Island Freedmen's Colony
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.4
During the Civil War, former slaves freed by the Union army and African Americans who escaped to Union lines were given a village on Roanoke Island.
Format: article
Estuarine shorelines behind simple overwash barrier islands
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.13
This lesson is part of chapter one in the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students take another look at simple overwash and complex barrier islands. They examine more closely how overwash and inlet processes are crucial to the long-term maintenance of barrier islands and how these processes can affect human life.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.