K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.

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Gertrude Weil urges suffragists to action
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.9
Letter from Gertrude Weil, president of the North Carolina Equal Suffrage League, to supporters on the eve of the North Carolina General Assembly's vote on the Nineteenth Amendment. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
The North Carolina Equal Suffrage League
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.5
Report of the statewide organization working to obtain voting rights for women, 1917. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Gertrude Weil
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.4
Biography of Gertrude Weil (1879–1971) of Goldsboro, who led the fight for women's suffrage in North Carolina.
Format: biography
By Jill Molloy and L. Maren Wood.
Timeline of Women's Suffrage
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.1
A timeline of the major events in the long campaign for women's voting rights, from the nation's independence in 1776 to North Carolina's ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1971.
Format: timeline
By Jill Molloy.
African Americans get the vote in eastern North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.9
After the Civil War, African American communities in eastern North Carolina, having already tasted freedom during the war, were ready to fight for political rights.
Format: article
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Raleigh Freedmen's Convention
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 8.6
Declaration of the statewide convention of freedman held in Raleigh, North Carolina, September 29-October 3, 1866. Includes historical commentary.
Format: declaration/primary source
Governor Aycock on "the negro problem"
In North Carolina in the New South, page 8.9
Speech by North Carolina Governor Charles Brantley Aycock, 1903, in which Aycock proclaims both the absolute supremacy of the white race and the importance of education for all citizens. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source