K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.

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Masthead from the North Carolina Gazette, 1777
Masthead from the North Carolina Gazette, 1777
James Davis originally published the North-Carolina Gazette from 1751 until around 1760. He began a new newspaper, The North-Carolina Magazine; Or Universal Intelligencer in 1764 and published this until around 1768. In May 1768 he started over again, this...
Format: image/newspaper
North Carolina's first newspaper
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.11
Without the large port cities of other colonies, North Carolina did not get its first newspaper until 1751. In the second half of the eighteenth century, newspapers were founded in several cities across the coastal plain and Piedmont.
Format: article
Teaching suggestions: The North Carolina Gazette and Poor Richard's Almanack
This list of teaching suggestions will support students' understanding of how information was disseminated during the colonial era, as they read an article about North Carolina's first newspaper and a series of colonial-era excerpts from Poor Richard's Almanack.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
A union organizer blames the mill
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.4
Article printed by the Gastonia Daily Gazette during the Loray Mill strike in 1929, one of the few printed that represented the views of the strikers. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The strikers move into tents
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.5
Article from the Gastonia Daily Gazette printed during the Loray Mill strike, 1929. Striking workers were thrown out of their houses, which were owned by the mill. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Aftermath of the Battle of Alamance
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.12
Contemporary newspaper account of the prosecution and execution of Regulator leaders after the Battle of Alamance, May/June 1771. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
An industry representative visits Loray Mills
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.3
Article from the Charlotte Observer during the Loray Mill strike in Gastonia, 1929. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A Pledge to Violate the Stamp Act
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 2.5
In 1766, during the colonial protests of the Stamp Act, some residents of eastern North Carolina, including many colonial leaders, signed this pledge to refuse to pay the tax. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Thomas Day
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 4.4
Biography of Thomas Day, a free African American in antebellum Caswell County who was North Carolina's most famous furniture craftsman and cabinetmaker.
Format: article
The Stanly-Spaight Duel
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 8.1
In early nineteenth-century North Carolina, arguments often ended in duels. The 1802 duel between Richard Dobbs Spaight and John Stanly, in which Spaight was killed, led to legislation outlawing the practice, but the law had little immediate effect.
Format: article
The Third North Carolina Regiment
In North Carolina in the New South, page 6.4
In the Spanish-American War, North Carolina raised an all-black regiment under black command. The soldiers faced racism and violence from whites both in and out of the military, and white Democrats campaigned against the regiment in 1898.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The police chief is killed
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.7
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 4.7
Article from the Gastonia Daily Gazette about the killing of the town's police chief during the 1929 Loray Mill strike. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Chaos in Hillsborough
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.9
Contemporary newspaper report about mob violence in Hillsborough, North Carolina, in October 1770. The violence was part of a series of protests by Regulators angry with illegal fees and corrupt officials. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The strike begins
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.2
Article from the Gastonia Daily Gazette at the beginning of the Loray Mill strike in 1929. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
An authentick relation of the Battle of Alamance
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.11
Contemporary newspaper account of the Battle of Alamance, fought between Regulators and militia led by Governor William Tryon on May 16, 1771. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream!
Biltmore Dairy ice cream also played a leading role at estate gatherings — Cornelia’s birthday celebrations, Christmas parties, May Day festivities, and picnics. In fact, virtually every oral history interview or questionnaire containing childhood...
Format: article
By Sue Clark McKendree.
The cost of Tryon Palace
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.8
Table detailing the expenses of building Tryon Palace, the residence of the colonial governor at New Bern, North Carolina, in 1770. Includes historical commentary about why these expenses infuriated many colonists.
Format: document/primary source
Insurrections in North Carolina?
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 9.7
Article from a Raleigh newspaper reporting alleged slave insurrections in North Carolina, and white responses to these rumors, following Nat Turner's Rebellion in 1831. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Congress considers an inquiry into textile strikes
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.6
Newspaper article about a congressional debate about southern textile strikes, 1929. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.