K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.

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North Carolina State Capitol
Discover the truth! Does the Capitol Building in Raleigh really have an escape tunnel? Secret rooms? Find out the answers to these questions and more at your state capital's website!
Format: article/field trip opportunity
North Carolina State Capitol, 1937
North Carolina State Capitol, 1937
Format: image/photograph
Capital Area Visitor Information
Find information for scheduling a free comprehensive tour of many of Raleigh's cultural attractions and a description of the sites you can visit, including the State Capitol, the State Legislative Building, the Executive Mansion, the North Carolina Museum of Art, the North Carolina Museum of History, and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Statue of George Washington, North Carolina State Capitol
Statue of George Washington, North Carolina State Capitol
This statue of George Washington in the rotunda of the North Carolina State Capitol is a reproduction of the original by Antonio Canova.
Format: image/photograph
North Carolina Executive Mansion
A history with images of the governor's mansion in Raleigh, North Carolina. Explore the gardens, the library, the ballroom, and more...all online. Read a brief history of NC's current first family.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Exploring monuments in North Carolina's capital
In this lesson, students will research a Raleigh monument and then locate and explore the monument on a field trip to Raleigh.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 English Language Arts, Information Skills, and Social Studies)
By Stephanie Dixon.
Statue of Worth Bagley in Raleigh
Statue of Worth Bagley in Raleigh
This statue of Worth Bagley, the only U.S. Naval officer killed during the Spanish-American War and a native of Raleigh, stands in front of the State Capitol in Raleigh, North Carolina.
Format: image/photograph
Zebulon Vance House
Known as the Civil War governor, Zebulon Vance moved his headquarters to this house in Statesville during the last months of the war.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Canova's statue of George Washington
Canova's statue of George Washington
Format: image/illustration
Tar Heels pitch in
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.7
"Tar Heel," evidence indicates, was a derogatory nickname applied to North Carolina soldiers by others in the Army of Northern Virginia. It was a natural, given that the boys from the piney woods oftentimes were harvesters of tar, pitch, and turpentine. It...
Format: article
Native Americans in North Carolina
In North Carolina maps, page 2.6
In this lesson, students create a PowerPoint presentation giving the history and impact of one of the six major Native American tribes of North Carolina. They will show understanding of population movement, different perspectives, and the roles the Native Americans played in the development of the state.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
The Wilmington and Weldon Railroad
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 5.4
When it was built in 1840, the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad was the longest in the world. During the Civil War it became known as the "lifeline of the Confederacy" for its role in moving goods from the port of Wilmington to Lee's army in Virginia.
Format: article
Timeline of the Civil War, January–June 1861
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 1.1
Timeline of secession and the beginning of the Civil War.
Format: timeline
A capital in the "wilderness"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 1.3
In 1792, the North Carolina General Assembly voted to place a permanent state capital in Wake County. Joel Lane sold 1,000 acres of land to the state, and in the years that followed, the city of Raleigh was planned and built.
Format: article
Paper money in the Civil War
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.5
The Confederate government and the states issued paper money during the Civil War -- a great deal of it, and in many forms. This article includes some examples of North Carolina's paper money, and explains the effect of paper money on prices.
Format: article
A proclamation, by John W. Ellis
A proclamation, by John W. Ellis
This proclamation was printed in Raleigh, North Carolina in 1861: STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA A PROCLAMATION, BY JOHN W. ELLIS GOVERNOR OF NORTH CAROLINA WHEREAS: By Proclamation of Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, followed by a requistion...
Format: image/ephemera
Ensign Worth Bagley
In North Carolina in the New South, page 6.5
Worth Bagley of Raleigh, North Carolina, was the only U.S. naval officer killed in the Spanish-American War.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Canova's statue of Washington
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.8
In 1815, at a time when the state of North Carolina was unwilling to spend money on roads or schools, the General Assembly spent as much as $60,000 on a statue of George Washington for the State Capitol.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Pauline S. Johnson.
The history of the state fair
In North Carolina in the New South, page 1.9
The North Carolina State Fair was begun in the 1850s to showcase improvements in agriculture and teach farmers about scientific farming. By the early twentieth century it had grown and changed, but still held to its basic mission.
Format: article
By Melton McLaurin.
The cost of Tryon Palace
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.8
Table detailing the expenses of building Tryon Palace, the residence of the colonial governor at New Bern, North Carolina, in 1770. Includes historical commentary about why these expenses infuriated many colonists.
Format: document/primary source