K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

Cape Fear estuaries: From river to sea
A “virtual field trip” down the estuaries of the Cape Fear River from zero salinity to the ocean, with discussion of how local ecology changes along the way.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Conjunction of the Cape Fear River and the Northeast Cape Fear River
In Cape Fear estuaries: From river to sea, page 4
The town of Wilmington is located at the junction of the Northeast Cape Fear and Cape Fear rivers. In this photo the Cape Fear River is entering from the bottom. The water in the Cape Fear River is just turning salty as it reaches Wilmington, the zero salinity...
By Steve Keith.
Confluence of the Cape Fear River and Northeast Cape Fear River
Confluence of the Cape Fear River and Northeast Cape Fear River
Format: image/photograph
Satellite image and map of the North Carolina coast
Satellite image and map of the North Carolina coast
Format: image/map
Tar Heels pitch in
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.7
"Tar Heel," evidence indicates, was a derogatory nickname applied to North Carolina soldiers by others in the Army of Northern Virginia. It was a natural, given that the boys from the piney woods oftentimes were harvesters of tar, pitch, and turpentine. It...
Format: article
North Carolina rivers
Students will locate 28 rivers within the state of North Carolina, noting names and origins of names, directions of flow, navigability, and development of population centers in relation to the rivers.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Social Studies)
By Mike Stevenson.
North Carolina as a Civil War battlefield, November 1864–May 1865
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.2
Article describes major events and battles in North Carolina during the last year of the Civil War, including Sherman's Carolinas Campaign.
Format: article
Ten years later: Remembering Hurricane Floyd's wave of destruction
In Recent North Carolina, page 5.1
Retrospective article from the Wilmington Star-News recalls the impact of Hurricane Floyd on North Carolina in 1999.
Format: newspaper
Archaeological sites open to the public
A listing of field trip opportunities focusing on Native Americans as well as colonial times in North Carolina. Organized by county.
Format: article
Where am I? Mapping a New World
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 3.2
Early European travelers to the Americas reported bits and pieces of information back to Europe. Over the centuries, mapmakers assembled these reports into maps. As time went by, explorers and mapmakers compiled an increasingly accurate understanding of the Americas and of the world. To do so, they had to invent new tools for mapmaking, embrace radical new ideas about the shape of the world, and discard cherished beliefs.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The village farmers
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.5
North Carolina sat on a crossroads by AD 1000. Cultural ideas from other places breezed through it and around it: how to decorate pottery, how to orient political and social life, how to honor the dead, how to structure towns.
The forest people
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.3
Paleoindian culture died out across North America by 8000 BC. Archaeologists say this was bound to happen. The Ice Age had ended, the megafauna were extinct, and the boreal forests faded as deciduous ones spread across the East in the warmer climate. Faced with significant environmental changes, the Native Americans adapted. Archaeologists call their way of life and the time in which they lived Archaic.