K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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The unpainted aristocracy of Nags Head
In Natural and human impacts on the northern Outer Banks, page 10
In northern Nags Head some seaside homes have survived the frequent storms of the Outer Banks. Located near the intersection of Virginia Dare Trail (NC 12) and East Soundside Drive, these “unpainted aristocracy” homes are the oldest summer cottages...
By Blair Tormey and Dirk Frankenberg.
The northern Outer Banks
In Natural and human impacts on the northern Outer Banks, page 1
The United States is currently experiencing a population boom along its eastern coast, and the development of beaches and coastal areas is taking place at an alarming rate. As humans invade the coastal zone, more and more reports are heard of erosion and property...
By Blair Tormey and Dirk Frankenberg.
Natural and human impacts on the northern Outer Banks
This Carolina Environmental Diversity Explorations “virtual field trip” examines how coastal process continuously alter the structure of the Outer Banks, and how humans have adapted to and resisted these changes.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Dune formation
In Natural and human impacts on the northern Outer Banks, page 4
The migration of dunes in response to the prevailing winds is an important process on the Outer Banks. Nags Head Woods is flanked on three sides by large dune fields. To the north of the woods is the Run Hill dune field. Run Hill Dune is an unusually large,...
By Blair Tormey and Dirk Frankenberg.
Coquina Beach
In Natural and human impacts on the northern Outer Banks, page 12
Storm overwash is one of the more prevalent processes with which humans must cope on the Outer Banks. During storms, large volumes of sand are eroded from the seaward side of the islands and redeposited in large overwash fans, which extend landward across...
By Blair Tormey and Dirk Frankenberg.
The Outer Banks History Center
Visit the Outer Banks History Center and view exhibits and attend programs which pertain to North Carolina and the Outer Banks area.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Surviving storms
In Natural and human impacts on the northern Outer Banks, page 11
The first house on northern Nags Head was built by W. G. Pool, a doctor from Elizabeth City. Many of Dr. Pool's friends followed his lead — mostly because he gave them seaside lots as gifts — and a new era of seaside living began on the Outer Banks....
By Blair Tormey and Dirk Frankenberg.
Jockey's Ridge
In Natural and human impacts on the northern Outer Banks, page 9
Jockey's Ridge is the largest of the four remaining large dunes on the Outer Banks. The dune's immense size and its proximity to economic interests such as Route 158 have resulted in various attempts to control its migration. But the planting of American beach...
By Blair Tormey and Dirk Frankenberg.
Eco-tourism in the Outer Banks of North Carolina
Written to accompany a sixth-grade science lesson, this article describes the ecology of North Carolina's Outer Banks and discusses the effects of tourism on the region's delicate ecosystems.
Format: article
By April Galloway and Christine Scott.
Erosion in the Outer Banks
In North Carolina maps, page 3.2
In this lesson, students gain an understanding of the different perspectives on erosion in the Outer Banks over the past century by implementing research and map comparisons between Google Earth and early 20th century Coastal Maps.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Jennifer Job.
Eco-tourism in the Outer Banks
In CareerStart lessons: Grade six, page 3.10
In this lesson, students will learn about the effects of tourists on the delicate ecosystems of North Carolina's Outer Banks. Students will explore careers related to tourism and will attempt to solve tourism/erosion problems in the Outer Banks from a career-based perspective.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5–6 Guidance and Science)
By April Galloway and Christine Scott.
Ocracoke Island
There are many things to see on Ocracoke Island including the Ocracoke Lighthouse, the shortest lighthouse on the Outer Banks.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Preface
This page is a preface to the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks."
Format: article
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Outer Banks English
In this lesson plan, students view a video about the dialect of North Carolina's Outer Banks and develop an understanding of linguistic patterns.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Hannah Askin.
Nags Head Woods: A maritime forest
In Natural and human impacts on the northern Outer Banks, page 2
In many cases, the natural processes on the Outer Banks evolve from predetermined conditions, as exemplified by the landscape of Nags Head Woods. Nags Head Woods is a mature maritime forest that is bounded on three sides by the large dune complex of Jockey's...
By Blair Tormey and Dirk Frankenberg.
Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum
This museum is dedicated to the preservation of maritime history and shipwrecks of North Carolina's Outer Banks.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks
The lessons in this unit allow students to explore the processes affecting North Carolina's Outer Banks and the impact these processes have on daily life there.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Ocean beaches
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.12
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students learn about various materials found on the beaches of North Carolina's Outer Banks. They read about the processes that bring these materials to the beaches.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
OWLS - Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter
This wildlife shelter rehabilitates injured and orphaned native wild animals. They also educate the public on the importance of wildlife conservation.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Cape Hatteras Lighthouse
In Natural and human impacts on the northern Outer Banks, page 19
No structure better symbolizes the human struggle to cope with natural processes of the Outer Banks than the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. The first Cape Hatteras lighthouse was built in 1802, more than 3,000 feet from the coeval shoreline. The base of that first...
By Blair Tormey and Dirk Frankenberg.