K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Pilot Mountain
In Lonely mountains: The monadnocks of the inner Piedmont, page 5
Pilot Mountain has a striking profile long used as a landmark by both native Americans and early colonists. Rising more than 1,400 feet above the upper Piedmont plateau, it is easily seen from a distance.
By Dirk Frankenberg.
The Piedmont's first human inhabitants
In Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use, page 2
The first human inhabitants of the Piedmont to make use of its clays were the American Indians. People who lived along the banks of the Potomac and Savannah Rivers discovered the seemingly miraculous transformation of mud into stone by heat about 4500 years...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Wood-fired kiln
In Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use, page 14
Figure 15 shows another kind of kiln used by Piedmont potters. This wood-fired kiln operates on a cross-draft airflow with a fire at one end creating hot air that flows to a chimney at the other end. In this respect it is similar to the early “groundhog”...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Lonely mountains: The monadnocks of the inner Piedmont
This Carolina Environmental Diversity Explorations “virtual field trip” explores the geology of North Carolina's monadnocks, mountains that rise individually above the surrounding topogaphy.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Piedmont sands and clays
In Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use, page 10.10
North Carolina's landmass has twice been subjected to major bouts of mountain building followed by erosion. The mountain building events have been described in another field trip in this series, the Roan Mountain Highlands. The remnants of the erosion of these...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use
A “virtual field trip” through the North Carolina Piedmont and thousands of years of history explains the origin of Piedmont clays and how clay is made into pottery. With high-resolution photographs.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
North Carolina's lonely mountains
In Lonely mountains: The monadnocks of the inner Piedmont, page 1
One of the most striking sights on North Carolina's inner Piedmont is the solitary peaks or ridges that loom above the plateau's average elevation. Some of these are among the state's most visited parks: Hanging Rock, Pilot Mountain, Crowders Mountain, Stone...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Sauratown Mountains
In Lonely mountains: The monadnocks of the inner Piedmont, page 4
One of the best places to see real monadnocks in North Carolina's Piedmont is in the Sauratown Mountains north of Winston-Salem in Stokes and Surrey counties. Here are pinnacles and two high ridges that stretch west southwest from Hanging Rock and include...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Teaching suggestions: Governing the Piedmont
This set of teaching suggestions was designed to help students understand an article about the colonial government of the Piedmont.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 and 11 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Primary and secondary clays
In Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use, page 1.1
The old photograph on the introductory page and Figure 1 show secondary and primary clays being recovered from the earth's crust in North Carolina's Piedmont. Most of the clays used in pottery are secondary, but much brick-making clay and some specialized...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Colonial restrictions on pottery
In Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use, page 5
European colonists recognized clay as an important resource in developing their agricultural economy. Surprisingly, the king's governors restricted the manufacture of pottery because the British economic model for the empire (called mercantilism)...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Discussion questions: Expanding to the west
This set of discussion questions was designed to help students understand an article about the settlement of the Piedmont region of North Carolina between 1730 and 1775.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Piedmont Environmental Center
The Center provides programs and a place for people to learn, conserve, and enjoy the natural world through hands-on experiences.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Why does the Piedmont have so much clay and how is it used?
In Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use, page 1
North Carolina's Piedmont has so much clay because clay is, quite literally, “common as dirt.” Seventy-five percent of the earth's surface is composed of silica (SiO2) and aluminia (Al2O3), the primary ingredients...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Stone Mountain
In Lonely mountains: The monadnocks of the inner Piedmont, page 12
Quartzite is not the only erosion-resistant rock that has formed monadnocks on North Carolina's Piedmont. Another major rock type — granite — has also been responsible for monadnock formation. Granite is a granular rock made primarily of feldspar...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Piedmont cultures graphic organizer
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.3
This activity will assist students in understanding Piedmont cultures as they read the article "Peoples of the Piedmont."
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Why does North Carolina have so many, and so many kinds of, monadnocks?
In Lonely mountains: The monadnocks of the inner Piedmont, page 2
North Carolina has more than a dozen monadnocks scattered among its Blue Ridge mountains, and another ten or more on its Piedmont Plateau. These monadnocks formed during dramatic and diverse events that occurred as the state's crust formed. Most of these geologic...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
Composition of Pilot Mountain
In Lonely mountains: The monadnocks of the inner Piedmont, page 6
When viewed up close, the pinnacle of Pilot Mountain is seen to be made of almost horizontal layers of rock. This rock is quartzite, and the horizontal lines between the layers are bedding planes that mark the tops of the individual quartzite beds....
By Dirk Frankenberg.
From clay to pot
In Clays of the Piedmont: Origins, recovery, and use, page 9
The remainder of this field trip is devoted to showing what humans must do to convert the clays recovered from the ground as shown in the first two photographs into the objects shown in Figures 3 through 9. We need to begin by describing what happens to native...
By Dirk Frankenberg.
More folding
In Lonely mountains: The monadnocks of the inner Piedmont, page 10
Close examination of the rock surfaces above Gorges Creek shows small-scale folds of exactly the type you would expect to find where flexible layers of rock were being dragged over one another during development of a large scale fold in the overlying layers,...
By Dirk Frankenberg.