K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

oral history
A method of collecting historical information through recorded interviews with individuals who are willing to share their memories of the past.

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Dynamic dialect: Horace Kephart and Our Southern Highlanders
Students will read an excerpt from Horace Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders and explore how language and dialect have changed over the years.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 English Language Arts)
By Billie Clemens.
Businesses by county, 1854
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 4.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 9.3
In this activity, students explore an excerpt from the Southern Business Directory and General Commercial Advertiser of 1854 to learn about business and town life in antebellum North Carolina.
Format: activity
North Carolina Transportation Museum
All the details for your field trip to the museum. Or take a virtual trip and read about and explore the exhibits, including the Flue Shop, the Master Mechanic's Office, and the Robert Julian Roundhouse. Take a few minutes to watch the online video that explains the history of steam railroads in North Carolina.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Life on the land: Voices
In North Carolina in the New South, page 1.4
Excerpts of oral history interviews with men and women who grew up on farms in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century North Carolina.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Mill village and factory: Voices
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.5
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 5.2
Excerpts of oral history interviews with men and women who lived in mill villages and worked in textile mills in the early twentieth century.
Format: interview/primary source
Exploring the church in the southern black community
Students explore the Documenting the American South Collection titled, the “Church in the Southern Black Community.” Beginning with a historian's interpretation of the primary sources that make up the collection, students search the collection for evidence to describe the experiences of African Americans living in the south during the Antebellum through the Reconstruction Period centering on their community churches. The activity culminates in student presentations of a digital scrap book.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 and 10–12 Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Guilford Courthouse National Military Park
Describes the history of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, which marked the beginning of the end of the Revolutionary struggle. This unillustrated text covers topics including the Southern campaign, the Siege of Charleston, the Battles of Camden, Kings Mountain, and Cowpens. Students will learn about the pivotal battle in the Revolutionary War at the Guilford Courthouse when they visit the Military Park.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Work and protest: Voices
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 7.4
Excerpts from oral history interviews with textile mill workers about labor unrest in the 1920s and 1930s. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Secession and civil war
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 1.2
After Abraham Lincoln's election to the presidency in 1860, seven southern states seceded from the United States. Four more followed after South Carolina troops fired on Fort Sumter in April 1861 and Lincoln called for troops to put down the rebellion.
Format: article
The Southern Campaign of the American Revolution
The Southern Campaign of the American Revolution
Map showing the locations and dates of key battles in the Southern Campaign of the War of American Independence, 1780–1781.
Format: image/map
Slave songs
In this lesson, students learn more about the religious observances of slaves in the United States by presenting hymns from Slave Songs in the US digitized in the Documenting the American South Collection. This is a great lesson to introduce the intersection of religion and slavery in a US history or African American history class.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Southern women trailblazers
The resources on this page are designed to help educators teach about the changing role of women in American society, particularly in the south. By engaging in these activities, students will not only learn about women considered to be trailblazers in their time, but they will also think critically about traditional gender roles, women's roles in politics, academics, and professions, and the contributions of women to society.
Format: lesson plan
"The Southern Cross"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 1.9
George Tucker's adaptation of the Star Spangled Banner to the Confederate cause. Includes historical commentary.
Format: music/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Exploring first-person female narratives related to Sherman's march to the sea
This lesson plan uses first-person narratives from the Documenting the American South collection to demonstrate differences in perspective related to historical events, in this case, Sherman's march to the sea. It encourages students to compare the views of two southern ladies with that of a Union soldier.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Connecting with community through oral history
In Oral history in the classroom, page 5
Through interviews and photographs, Harnett County students learn about their community's agricultural past.
Format: article
By Jean Sweeney Shawver.
Allied advances in North Africa and southern Europe, 1942–1944
Allied advances in North Africa and southern Europe, 1942–1944
Format: image/map
Race in Charlotte schools
The lesson on this page are designed to help educators teach about school desegregation in the South. In these activities, students immerse themselves in a time period when public schools were first becoming integrated by listening to oral histories of people who experienced this change first-hand.
Format: lesson plan
Moses Cone Memorial Park and Flat Top Manor
This historic mansion houses one of five shops of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild. The crafts which include jewelry, pottery, glass figurines, and framed and unframed artwork are handmade by over 300 regional artists. Visitors can hear how the artists have come to make these wonderful crafts.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Western Carolina University Mountain Heritage Center
The Museum provides exhibitions and programs that illustrate many of the complex issues and concerns of Appalachia's diverse people and cultures. Students discover how history relates to their own lives as they explore the many themes relevant to western North Carolina's past, present, and future.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Long Way to Travel
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 6.5
Audio and lyrics of an African American spiritual. Includes historical commentary.
Format: music/primary source