K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

North Carolina thinking skills
Model of thinking skills adopted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in 1994. Lists seven levels of thinking skills from simplest to most complex: knowledge, organizing, applying, analyzing, generating, integrating, and evaluating.
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction administers the policies adopted by the State Board of Education and offers instructional, financial, technological, and personnel support to all public school systems in the state.

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USS North Carolina
USS North Carolina
The USS North Carolina at sea off the East Coast of the United States, April 1942.
Format: image/photograph
Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington, North Carolina
Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington, North Carolina
This is the USS North Carolina in Wilmington, North Carolina.
Format: image/photograph
The USS North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.4
Story of the USS North Carolina and its participation in World War II.
Format: article
Battleship North Carolina
Uses a variety of formats including oral histories, video footage, and zoomable images to cover the history of the USS North Carolina and other naval vessels afloat during WWII.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
Farmville's choice
In this lesson, students will learn about rural life in North Carolina at the turn of the century. Home demonstration and 4H clubs implemented many programs to help people learn better farming techniques, ways of preserving food, and taking care of the home. Several North Carolina leaders went to great lengths to ensure the success of these programs. In part of this activity, students help the town of Farmville dedicate a monument to one of those people.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Ensign Worth Bagley
In North Carolina in the New South, page 6.5
Worth Bagley of Raleigh, North Carolina, was the only U.S. naval officer killed in the Spanish-American War.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
4-H and Home Demonstration Work during World War II
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.3
During the years of World War II, North Carolina women were led by Home Demonstration and extension agents in programs to increase food production and preservation. 4-H clubs also aided the war effort, primarily through the "Food for Victory" program and the "Feed a Fighter" campaign.
Format: article
By Amy Manor.
North Carolina as a Civil War battlefield, May 1862–November 1864
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.1
Summary of military operations in North Carolina during the middle three years of the war, including the Confederate raid on Goldsboro, Potter's Raid, the Battle of Plymouth, and the sinking of the CSS Albemarle.
Format: article
The C.S.S. Albemarle in action, May 5, 1864
The C.S.S. Albemarle in action, May 5, 1864
19th Century photograph of an artwork by Acting Second Engineer Alexander C. Stuart, USN, 1864. It shows CSS Albemarle engaging several Federal gunboats on Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, on 5 May 1864. USS Sassacus is in left center, ramming the Confederate...
Format: image/illustration
The destruction of the CSS Albemarle
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.3
Report of Lieutenant William Barker Cushing, U.S. Navy, on the destruction of the ironclad CSS Albemarle during the Civil War. Includes historical commentary and background on ironclad ships, including a podcast.
Format: letter/primary source
Selling North Carolina, one image at a time
In Postwar North Carolina, page 2.9
By selling tourists the image of a state ready to entertain, enthrall, and serve, North Carolina public and private tourism promoters like Hugh Morton established the industry as one the state’s most important.
Format: essay
By Richard Starnes.