K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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From the education reference

oral history
A method of collecting historical information through recorded interviews with individuals who are willing to share their memories of the past.

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Martin Luther King, Jr. Online Visitor Information Center
Maintained by the National Park Service this web page is useful for anyone planning a trip to the King historic site in Atlanta, GA or interested in the life of the civil rights leader.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
The explosion of the U.S.S. Shaw
The explosion of the U.S.S. Shaw
On December 7, 1941, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Framed by a palm frond, this photograph shows the dramatic explosion of the destroyer, U.S.S. Shaw, and the billowing smoke over the island.
Format: image/photograph
Calvin Coolidge speaking at his inauguration
Calvin Coolidge speaking at his inauguration
Calvin Coolidge delivers his inaugural address in 1925. Calvin Coolidge was vice-president of the United States under President Warren G. Harding, and stepped into the presidency in 1923 upon Harding's death. A year later, he was elected to the office.
Format: image/photograph
Tobacco bag stringing: Elementary activity one
This activity for grades 3–6 will help students understand what tobacco bag stringing was and why it was important to communities in North Carolina and Virginia. Students will read and analyze an adapted introductory article about tobacco bag stringing.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Slave songs
In this lesson, students learn more about the religious observances of slaves in the United States by presenting hymns from Slave Songs in the US digitized in the Documenting the American South Collection. This is a great lesson to introduce the intersection of religion and slavery in a US history or African American history class.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Tobacco bag stringing: Elementary activity three
In this activity for grades 3–6, students will read and evaluate primary source letters from the Tobacco Bag Stringing collection. This should be done after Activity one, which is the introductory activity about tobacco bag stringing.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Negro Baseball League
The Walking Classroom students discuss a summary of the history of the Negro Leagues, from conception to collapse. The students will hear another side of how segregation affected the American population from the 1800’s to the 1940’s and learn about the...
Format: audio/podcast
Little girls work in the interior of a tobacco shed
Little girls work in the interior of a tobacco shed
Child laborers were hired for many types of jobs. In this photograph, little girls, ages eight, nine, and ten work in a tobacco barn. Sunlight is streaming in through large cracks between the wooden planks of the walls. They are standing in back of wooden...
Format: image/photograph
An introduction to slave narratives: Harriet Jacobs' Life of a Slave Girl
In this lesson, students will learn about the life experiences of slaves in the United States during the 1800s by reading the story of a North Carolina slave woman who eventually escaped.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Joe Hooten.
CSS Neuse II
Explore a full-size replica of the Confederate ironclad gunboat CSS Neuse located in Kinston, North Carolina.
Format: article/field trip opportunity
AOWS2: Nation in conflict - Founding figures of America in a global context
Not your old style history class. History teachers love to tell stories. And, students love to hear stories. However, listening to stories is not the same as doing history. We want our students to experience history. This online course studies methods of engaging students in the doing of history using primary sources.
Format: article/online course
The Trail of Tears comprehension quiz
Comprehension quiz to accompany The Walking Classroom The Trail of Tears lesson plan.
Format: document/worksheet
"Forward" to the great escape
In this lesson, students will read a primary source document from Documenting the American South and examine a painting by Jacob Lawrence to understand the conditions of the underground railroad before the Civil War. Students will then create a painting and a narrative related to the underground railroad.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Visual Arts Education and Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
Race in Charlotte schools
The lesson on this page are designed to help educators teach about school desegregation in the South. In these activities, students immerse themselves in a time period when public schools were first becoming integrated by listening to oral histories of people who experienced this change first-hand.
Format: lesson plan
Analyzing children's letters to Mrs. Roosevelt
Students will analyze letters that children wrote to Eleanor Roosevelt during the Great Depression.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Social Studies)
By Angie Panel Holthausen.
The Trail of Tears
The Walking Classroom kids discuss the history of the Trail of Tears and its aftermath. Mrs. Fenn joins them to share a Cherokee story-tellers’ observations and to discuss why the Cherokee from North Carolina were not forced onto Indian Territory, but allowed...
Format: audio/podcast
Along the Trail of Tears
A part of history is often forgotten when teaching younger students. This is the relocation of the Cherokee Indians when the white settlers wanted their property. The US Government moved whole groups of Indians under harsh conditions. This trip became known as the Trail of Tears. Using this as a background students will explore and experiment with persuasive writing as they try to express the position of Cherokee leaders.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Glenda Bullard.
Who started the Civil War? Comparing perspectives on the causes of the war
This lesson plans presents the account of Rose O'Neal Greenhow, a confederate spy during the Civil War. Students are encouraged to find confirming and refuting evidence of her perspective on what caused the Civil War by browsing the Documenting the American South Collection of digitized primary sources.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Impressed with embargo
Students will learn about the causes of the War of 1812 and make connections to current world events.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Andrea McGuire.
Southern women trailblazers
The resources on this page are designed to help educators teach about the changing role of women in American society, particularly in the south. By engaging in these activities, students will not only learn about women considered to be trailblazers in their time, but they will also think critically about traditional gender roles, women's roles in politics, academics, and professions, and the contributions of women to society.
Format: lesson plan